IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Airline Schedule Recovery after Airport Closures: Empirical Evidence since September 11

  • Nicholas G. Rupp

    ()

    (Department of Economics, East Carolina University)

  • George M. Holmes

    (University of North Carolina)

  • Jeff DeSimone

    (Department of Economics, University of South Florida)

Since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, repeated airport closures due to security breaches have imposed substantial costs on travelers, airlines, and government agencies in terms of flight delays and cancellations. Using data from the year following September 11, this study examines how airlines recover flight schedules upon reopening of airports that have been closed for security reasons. As such, this is the first study to empirically examine service quality during irregular airport operations. Our results indicate that economic considerations, particularly the potential revenue per flight, have predictable effects on service quality following airport closures. Airport concentration, hub destination, and various logistical factors also significantly influence flight outcomes.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 71 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 800-820

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:71:4:y:2005:p:800-820
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Jan K. Brueckner, 2002. "Airport Congestion When Carriers Have Market Power," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1357-1375, December.
  2. Christopher Mayer & Todd Sinai, 2002. "Network Effects, Congestion Externalities, and Air Traffic Delays: Or Why All Delays Are Not Evil," NBER Working Papers 8701, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Borenstein, Severin & Netz, Janet, 1999. "Why do all the flights leave at 8 am?: Competition and departure-time differentiation in airline markets," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 611-640, July.
  4. Nicholas G. Rupp & D. Owens & L. W. Plumly, . "Does Competition Influence Airline On Time Performance?," Working Papers 0115, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  5. Nick Rupp & Mark Holmes, . "Why Are So Many Flights Canceled?," Working Papers 0204, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  6. Thengvall, Benjamin G. & Yu, Gang & Bard, Jonathan F., 2001. "Multiple fleet aircraft schedule recovery following hub closures," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 289-308, May.
  7. Stephen Foreman, 1999. "Publication of Information and Market Response: The Case of Airline on Time Performance Reports," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 147-162, March.
  8. Kim, E Han & Singal, Vijay, 1993. "Mergers and Market Power: Evidence from the Airline Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 549-69, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:71:4:y:2005:p:800-820. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laura Razzolini)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.