IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Differential Demand Systems: A Further Look at Barten's Synthesis


  • Toshinobu Matsuda

    () (Department of Agricultural Management and Information Science, Tottori University)


Barten's synthetic model is attractive to applied researchers since it is useful for testing the adequacy of the competing functional forms of differential demand systems including the popular Rotterdam and almost ideal demand systems. This article shows that the synthetic model is not a mere artificial composite of the known differential demand systems as it has been considered, but rather viewed as a model in its own right. It is demonstrated that, at the individual consumer level, Barten's model has the same marginal budget shares as generated by specific forms of Engel curves formulated by the Box–Cox transformation.

Suggested Citation

  • Toshinobu Matsuda, 2005. "Differential Demand Systems: A Further Look at Barten's Synthesis," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 607-619, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:71:3:y:2005:p:607-619

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jan Isaksen, 2002. "Energy cooperation in Southern Africa: What role for Norway?," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:4, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    2. Summers, Lawrence H & Pritchett, Lant H, 1993. "The Structural-Adjustment Debate," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 383-389, May.
    3. Ivar Kolstad, 2003. "The evolution of social norms," CMI Working Papers WP 2003:1, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    4. Dollar, David & Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "What Explains the Success or Failure of Structural Adjustment Programmes?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(466), pages 894-917, October.
    5. Alesina, Alberto & Dollar, David, 2000. "Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 33-63, March.
    6. Abreu, Dilip, 1988. "On the Theory of Infinitely Repeated Games with Discounting," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(2), pages 383-396, March.
    7. Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "Foreign aid and rent-seeking," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 437-461, August.
    8. Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "When is foreign aid policy credible? Aid dependence and conditionality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 61-84, February.
    9. Odd-Helge Fjeldstad, 2002. "Fighting fiscal corruption: The case of the Tanzania Revenue Authority," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:3, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    10. C-J. Dalgaard & H. Hansen, 2001. "On Aid, Growth and Good Policies," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(6), pages 17-41.
    11. Odd-Helge Fjeldstad, 2002. "The fight against corruption and the role of parliamentarians," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:6, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    12. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    13. Basu, Kaushik, 1986. "One Kind of Power," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 259-282, July.
    14. Henrik Hansen & Finn Tarp, 2000. "Aid effectiveness disputed," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 375-398, April.
    15. Hatlebakk, Magnus, 2002. "A new and robust subgame perfect equilibrium in a model of triadic power relations," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 225-232, June.
    16. Ussif Rashid Sumaila & Joseph Apaloo, 2002. "A selected survey of traditional and evolutionary game theory," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:7, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    17. Hansen, Henrik & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Aid and growth regressions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 547-570, April.
    18. Pedersen, Karl R, 1996. " Aid, Investment and Incentives," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(3), pages 423-438.
    19. Trumbull, William N & Wall, Howard J, 1994. "Estimating Aid-Allocation Criteria with Panel Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 876-882, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Widenhorn & Klaus Salhofer, 2014. "Price Sensitivity Within and Across Retail Formats," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(2), pages 184-194, March.
    2. Fengxia Dong & Frank Fuller, 2010. "Dietary Structural Change in China's Cities: Empirical Fact or Urban Legend?," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(1), pages 73-91, March.
    3. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2012. "The Demand for Disaggregated Food-Away-from-Home and Food-at-Home Products in the United States," Economic Research Report 132469, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Muhammad, Andrew & Ngeleza, Guyslain, 2010. "Emergence of Sri Lanka in European fish trade," IFPRI discussion papers 978, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Bakhtavoryan, Rafael, 2017. "Brand-Level Demand Analysis of Mayonnaise in Northeast Texas," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 251922, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Dengjun Zhang & Henry W. Kinnucan, 2014. "Exchange Rate Volatility and US Import Demand for Salmon," Marine Resource Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 411-430.
    7. Widenhorn, Andreas & Salhofer, Klaus, 2014. "Using a Generalized Differenced Demand Model to Estimate Price and Expenditure Elasticities for Milk and Meat in Austria," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 63(2).
    8. Muhammad, Andrew & D’Souza, Anna & Amponsah, William, 2013. "Violence, Instability, and Trade: Evidence from Kenya’s Cut Flower Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 20-31.
    9. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2011. "Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 251908.
    10. Michael A. Trousdale & Richard A. Dunn, 2014. "Demand for Lottery Gambling: Evaluating Price Sensitivity Within a Portfolio of Lottery Games," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 67(3), pages 595-620, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:71:3:y:2005:p:607-619. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laura Razzolini). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.