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Child Labor and the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children

Author

Listed:
  • C. Simon Fan

    () (Department of Economics, Lingnan University, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong)

Abstract

This article analyzes the impacts of child labor on the interaction between the quantity and quality of children in the spirit of Becker and Lewis. It shows that, without child labor, the quantity of children can be a normal good so that it increases with parental income under some fairly standard formulations. However, the correlation between fertility and parental income becomes negative when the role of child labor is considered. The model also implies that fertility increases with the wage rate of child labor. Moreover, it suggests that government intervention not only directly affects the supply of child labor but also influences parents' decisions on fertility, which indirectly determines children's labor market participations.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Simon Fan, 2004. "Child Labor and the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(1), pages 21-35, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:71:1:y:2004:p:21-35
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2002. "Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1133-1191.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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