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An Empty Promise: Average Cost Savings and Scale Economies among Canadian and American Manufacturers, 1910–1988

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  • Ian Keay

    (Queen's University, Department of Economics)

Abstract

During the debate that led up to the implementation of a bilateral free-trade agreement between Canada and the United States on January 1, 1989, much was made of economists' claims that both nations could expect significant welfare improvements as a result of the removal of tariffs on traded goods. The welfare gains were expected to flow from average cost savings associated with the exploitation of scale economies. In this article, I show that it was overly optimistic to predict substantive, permanent average cost convergence as a result of adjustments in the scale of production among Canadian or American manufacturing firms. I conclude that the formation of reasonable expectations regarding the effects of trade-induced output adjustments should consider global- and local scale economies and should employ data that are not dominated by a single cycle of macroeconomic volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Keay, 2003. "An Empty Promise: Average Cost Savings and Scale Economies among Canadian and American Manufacturers, 1910–1988," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 374-388, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:70:2:y:2003:p:374-388
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. William Levernier & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2000. "The Causes of Regional Variations in U.S. Poverty: A Cross-County Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 473-497.
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