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International Trade and the Accumulation of Human Capital

  • Ann L. Owen

Changes in the terms of trade affect both the incentives and the ability of individuals to purchase education in a credit-constrained economy. A model is developed that shows how individual decision-making is affected in a small economy when it opens up to trade. Empirical results indicate that credit constraints are an important factor influencing school enrollment rates, particularly in low income countries. As a result, countries with low human capital stocks tend to increase their accumulation of human capital with increased trade. The response in high income countries is more muted.

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Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 66 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 61-81

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:66:1:y:1999:p:61-81
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/

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  1. Ruth A. Judson & Ann L. Owen, 1997. "Estimating dynamic panel data models: a practical guide for macroeconomists," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-3, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Donald R. Davis & Trevor A. Reeve, 2000. "Human capital, unemployment, and relative wages in a global economy," International Finance Discussion Papers 659, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1989. "Trade; Innovation; And Growth," Papers 154, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
  4. Gary Burtless, 1995. "International Trade and the Rise in Earnings Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 800-816, June.
  5. Iyigun, Murat F, 1999. "Public Education and Intergenerational Economic Mobility," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 697-710, August.
  6. Findlay, Ronald & Kierzkowski, Henryk, 1983. "International Trade and Human Capital: A Simple General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(6), pages 957-78, December.
  7. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1989. "Endogenous Product Cycles," NBER Working Papers 2913, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-26, November.
  9. Perotti, Roberto, 1994. "Income distribution and investment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 827-835, April.
  10. Owen, Ann L. & Weil, David N., 1998. "Intergenerational earnings mobility, inequality and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 71-104, February.
  11. Feenstra, R.C. & Hanson, G.H., 1995. "Foreign Investment, Outsourcing and Relative Wages," Department of Economics 95-14, California Davis - Department of Economics.
  12. Stokey, Nancy L, 1996. " Free Trade, Factor Returns, and Factor Accumulation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 421-47, December.
  13. Galor, Oded, 1992. "A Two-Sector Overlapping-Generations Model: A Global Characterization of the Dynamical System," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(6), pages 1351-86, November.
  14. Edward E. Leamer, 1996. "In Search of Stolper-Samuelson Effects on U.S. Wages," NBER Working Papers 5427, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Kiviet, Jan F., 1995. "On bias, inconsistency, and efficiency of various estimators in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 53-78, July.
  16. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 2013. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Working Papers 2013-12, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  17. Fernandez, Raquel & Rogerson, Richard, 1995. "On the Political Economy of Education Subsidies," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 249-62, April.
  18. Anderson, T. W. & Hsiao, Cheng, 1982. "Formulation and estimation of dynamic models using panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 47-82, January.
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