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Competitiveness of Southern Metropolitan Areas: The Role of New Economy Policies

Author

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  • Dudensing, Rebekka M.

    (TX A&M U)

  • Barkley, David L.

    (Center for Economic Development, Clemson U)

Abstract

The concept of regional competitiveness is increasingly popular among academics and policymakers as indicated by reports that rank or grade regional economies. Competitiveness in these studies generally is measured by growth rates in population, employment, and per capita income. This paper explores the relationships between New Economy development policies (innovation, entrepreneurship, and human capital development) and changes in competitiveness outcomes for Southern metropolitan areas. Our results suggest that inputs have different associations with regional competitiveness outcomes. Regional employment growth rates are positively associated with innovation and entrepreneurship while changes in per capita income are related to measures of human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Dudensing, Rebekka M. & Barkley, David L., 2010. "Competitiveness of Southern Metropolitan Areas: The Role of New Economy Policies," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2), pages 197-226.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:40:y:2010:i:2:p:197-226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Luís Silveira Santos & Isabel Proença, 2017. "The Inversion of the Spatial Lag Operator in Binary Choice Models: Fast Computation and a Closed Formula Approximation," Working Papers REM 2017/11, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regional;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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