IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/rre/publsh/v40y2010i2p145-58.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Institutions and Comparative Regional Research

Author

Listed:
  • Stallmann, Judith I.

    (U MO)

Abstract

This is a personal view of regional science, which draws on my experiences and my training in both institutional economics and regional economics. I will start with some of those experiences and the questions they raised for me about the importance of institutions1 in regional development and some of the difficulties of doing comparative regional research. While I include regions at many levels of aggregation, my particular interest is how to incorporate institutions into the analysis of regional differences in economic development. I want to explore what literature and methods are out there that can provide insights into better ways of incorporating institutions into comparative regional research.

Suggested Citation

  • Stallmann, Judith I., 2010. "Institutions and Comparative Regional Research," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2), pages 145-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:40:y:2010:i:2:p:145-58
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/205/160
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nathan Nunn, 2009. "The Importance of History for Economic Development," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 65-92, May.
    2. Edella Schlager & Elinor Ostrom, 1992. "Property-Rights Regimes and Natural Resources: A Conceptual Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(3), pages 249-262.
    3. Rogers, Cynthia L., 2004. "Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) Policy on the Urban Fringe," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1).
    4. Mark D. Partridge, 2005. "Does Income Distribution Affect U.S. State Economic Growth?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 363-394.
    5. Barkley, David L., 1998. "Communities Left Behind: Can Nonviable Places Become Smart?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(2), pages 1-18, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regional;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:40:y:2010:i:2:p:145-58. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher Yencha). General contact details of provider: http://www.srsa.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.