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Co-operatives and Rural Community Population Growth: Evidence from Canada

  • Kangayi, Chipo

    (U Saskatchewan)

  • Olfert, M. Rose

    (U Saskatchewan)

  • Partridge, Mark

    (OH State U)

The social economy holds promise for rural community development through local capacity building, improving political engagement, expanding networks, and increasing productivity by reducing transactions costs. In this study, the contribution of co-op membership to rural community population growth is estimated, along with standard growth determinants. With minor exceptions, the results do not support the expectation that co-ops improve the population growth prospects of rural communities. Currency (or obsolescence) of this particular type of social capital may be a factor. Alternatively, social capital in the form of co-ops may be serving as a substitute for private sector enterprise or other forms of social capital.

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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 39 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 49-71

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:39:y:2009:i:1:p:49-71
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  1. Kean Birch & Geoff Whittam, 2008. "The Third Sector and the Regional Development of Social Capital," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(3), pages 437-450, April.
  2. Rupasingha, Anil & Goetz, Stephan J. & Freshwater, David, 2000. "Social Capital and Economic Growth: A County-Level Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 565-572, December.
  3. John F. Helliwell & Robert D. Putnam, 1995. "Economic Growth and Social Capital in Italy," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 21(3), pages 295-307, Summer.
  4. Simon, Curtis J., 1998. "Human Capital and Metropolitan Employment Growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-243, March.
  5. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-78, December.
  6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "Do We Know Economic Development When We See It?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(1), pages 17-39.
  7. Rupasingha, Anil & Goetz, Stephan J. & Freshwater, David, 2000. "Social Capital And Economic Growth: A County-Level Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(03), December.
  8. Chou, Yuan K., 2006. "Three simple models of social capital and economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 889-912, October.
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