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Study of Agricultural Productivity and Its Convergence across China's Regions

Author

Listed:
  • Li, Guoping

    (Xi'an Jiaotong U)

  • Zeng, Xianfeng

    (Xi'an Jiaotong U)

  • Zhang, Lizhen

    (Huaiyin Teachers College)

Abstract

Because it has a large, growing population but only a small share of land that can be cultivated, it is important for China to enhance its agricultural productivity through technological progress. Using data envelopment analysis, we decompose productivity into pure technical efficiency change, scale efficiency change, and technological progress. We thereby find that annual growth of agricultural productivity in China is about 2.2 percent. Technological progress improved agricultural productivity at a rate of 4.2 percent annually from 1980 to 2005, but the technology efficiency dampened it by an average of 1.9 percent per year. TFP growth and technological progress are faster in eastern provinces than for those in central and western regions. Relative technology efficiency was stable in eastern provinces but declined in the central and western provinces during the study period. Thus, it was technological progress that boosted the TFP growth in china's agriculture. Tests also reveal that sigma convergence existed in Chinese agricultural productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Guoping & Zeng, Xianfeng & Zhang, Lizhen, 2008. "Study of Agricultural Productivity and Its Convergence across China's Regions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 38(3), pages 361-379.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:38:y:2008:i:3:p:361-79
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    Cited by:

    1. Anwar, Sajid & Sun, Sizhong, 2015. "Can the presence of foreign investment affect the capital structure of domestic firms?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 32-43.
    2. Cheong, Tsun Se & Wu, Yanrui, 2013. "Regional disparity, transitional dynamics and convergence in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-14.
    3. Brandt, Loren & Van Biesebroeck, Johannes & Zhang, Yifan, 2014. "Challenges of working with the Chinese NBS firm-level data," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 339-352.
    4. Lemoine, Françoise & Poncet, Sandra & Ünal, Deniz, 2015. "Spatial rebalancing and industrial convergence in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 39-63.
    5. Wang, Sun Ling & Huang, Jikun & Wang, Xiaobing & Tuan, Francis, 2016. "China’s Regional Agricultural Productivity Growth: Catching Up or Lagging Behind," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235709, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural Productivity; Agriculture; Productivity; Regions;

    JEL classification:

    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • P32 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Collectives; Communes; Agricultural Institutions
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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