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China's Regional Disparity in Demographic Transition: A Spatial Analysis

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  • Wang, Jiamin

    (George Mason U)

Abstract

China's regional income gap has given rise to different socio-economic characteristics of its core and periphery, leading to different expressions in demographic transition. This paper explores the spatial pattern of China's fertility, age, migration, and household transition and finds that the regional pattern of demographic transition roughly follows a gradient of provinces' economic status. Further analysis indicates that this pattern is more sensitive to economic conditions in rural areas than in urban equivalents.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Jiamin, 2008. "China's Regional Disparity in Demographic Transition: A Spatial Analysis," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 38(3), pages 289-317.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:38:y:2008:i:3:p:289-317
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Regional; Rural; Spatial; Urban;

    JEL classification:

    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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