IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

City-Industry Agglomeration and Changes in the Geographic Concentration of Industry

  • Gabe, Todd M.

    (U ME)

This paper investigates the effects of industry agglomeration on growth in U.S. metropolitan areas, and then examines whether these agglomeration effects contribute to changes in the geographic concentration of industry. Study results suggest that a high localization of industry, measured using location quotients, leads to a decrease in city-industry growth as indicated by the net change in establishment counts. Alternatively, large initial city-industry size is associated with an increase in the change in the number of establishments above or below what is explained by overall metropolitan area growth. Both of these agglomeration effects contribute to a greater dispersion of industry.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/160/109
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 38 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 173-93

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:38:y:2008:i:2:p:173-93
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.srsa.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser, 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," NBER Working Papers 4840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 127-138, Spring.
  3. Edward J. Feser, 2002. "Tracing the Sources of Local External Economies," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(13), pages 2485-2506, December.
  4. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  6. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
  7. Feldman, Maryann P. & Audretsch, David B., 1999. "Innovation in cities:: Science-based diversity, specialization and localized competition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 409-429, February.
  8. Guy Dumais & Glenn Ellison & Edward L Glaeser, 1998. "Geographic Concentration as a Dynamic Process," Working Papers 98-3, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  9. Head, Keith & Ries, John & Swenson, Deborah, 1995. "Agglomeration benefits and location choice: Evidence from Japanese manufacturing investments in the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 223-247, May.
  10. Carlton, Dennis W, 1983. "The Location and Employment Choices of New Firms: An Econometric Model with Discrete and Continuous Endogenous Variables," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 440-49, August.
  11. David L. Rigby & J¸rgen Essletzbichler, 2002. "Agglomeration economies and productivity differences in US cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(4), pages 407-432, October.
  12. Guimaraes, Paulo & Figueiredo, Octavio & Woodward, Douglas, 2000. "Agglomeration and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment in Portugal," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 115-135, January.
  13. William J. Coffey & Richard G. Shearmur, 2002. "Agglomeration and Dispersion of High-order Service Employment in the Montreal Metropolitan Region, 1981-96," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(3), pages 359-378, March.
  14. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1986. "Efficiency of resource usage and city size," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 47-70, January.
  15. Yunsoo Kim & David L. Barkley & Mark S. Henry, 2000. "Industry Characteristics Linked to Establishment Concentrations in Nonmetropolitan Areas," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 234-259.
  16. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
  17. Christopher Fawson & Dawn Thilmany & John E. Keith, 1998. "Employment Stability and the Role of Sectoral Dominance in Rural Economies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 521-533.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:38:y:2008:i:2:p:173-93. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark L. Burkey)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.