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Do Migrating Seniors Affect Business Establishment and Job Growth? An Empirical Look at Southeastern Nonmetropolitan Counties, 2000-2004

  • Lambert, D. M.

    (U TN)

  • Clark, C. D.

    (U TN)

  • Wilcox, M. D.

    (U TN)

  • Park, W. M.

    (U TN)

Migrating seniors are choosing to live in nonmetropolitan areas. Many nonmetropolitan communities are, in turn, focusing on recruiting retirees as an economic development strategy. This paper applies a regional growth model to measure the impact of migrating seniors (between 1995 and 2000) on employment and business establishment growth in the southeastern United States from 2000 to 2004. This region is a popular senior destination due to low taxes, mild climate, inexpensive housing, and proximity to friends and families. The economic impacts of senior migration are spatially heterogeneous across the region, suggesting alternative policy implications for urban and nonurban communities.

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File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/151/100
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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 37 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 251-78

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:37:y:2007:i:2:p:251-78
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