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Spatial Structure and Spatial Interaction: 25 Years Later

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  • Griffith, Daniel A.

    (U TX, Dallas)

Abstract

In the 1970s, spatial autocorrelation (i.e., local distance and configuration effects) and distance decay (i.e., global distance effects) were suspected of being intermingled in spatial interaction model specifications. This convolution was first treated in a theoretical context by Curry (1972), with some subsequent debate (e.g., Curry, Griffith, and Sheppard 1975). This work was followed by a documentation of the convolution (e.g., Griffith and Jones 1980) and further theoretical treatment of the role spatial autocorrelation plays in spatial interaction modeling (e.g., Griffith 1982). But methodology did not exist at the time--or even soon thereafter--to easily or fully address spatial autocorrelation effects within spatial interaction model specifications, a contention attested to and demonstrated by the cumbersome and difficult-to-implement techniques employed by, for example, Bolduc, Laferriere, and Santarossa (1992, 1995) and Bolduc, Fortin, and Gordon (1997). Today, however, eigenfunction-based spatial filtering offers a methodology that can account for spatial autocorrelation effects within a spatial interaction model. This paper updates work from the early 1980s, extending it with spatial filtering methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Griffith, Daniel A., 2007. "Spatial Structure and Spatial Interaction: 25 Years Later," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 37(1), pages 28-38.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:37:y:2007:i:1:p:28-38
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    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/135/86
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Denis Bolduc & Bernard Fortin & Stephen Gordon, 1997. "Multinomial Probit Estimation of Spatially Interdependent Choices: An Empirical Comparison of Two New Techniques," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 20(1-2), pages 77-101, April.
    2. D A Griffith & K G Jones, 1980. "Explorations into the relationship between spatial structure and spatial interaction," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 12(2), pages 187-201, February.
    3. D A Griffith & K G Jones, 1980. "Explorations into the Relationship between Spatial Structure and Spatial Interaction," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 12(2), pages 187-201, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel A. Griffith & Manfred M. Fischer & James LeSage, 2017. "The spatial autocorrelation problem in spatial interaction modelling: a comparison of two common solutions," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 75-86, March.
    2. James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2008. "Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin-Destination Flows," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 941-967.
    3. M. Alonso & M. Beamonte & P. Gargallo & M. Salvador, 2014. "Labour and residential accessibility: a Bayesian analysis based on Poisson gravity models with spatial effects," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 409-439, October.
    4. Yongwan Chun, 2008. "Modeling network autocorrelation within migration flows by eigenvector spatial filtering," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 317-344, December.
    5. Angulo, A. M. & Mtimet, N. & Dhehibi, B. & Atwi, M. & Ben Youssef , O. & Gil, J. M. & Sai, M. B., 2011. "A revisited gravity equation in trade flow analysis: an application to the case of Tunisian olive oil exports," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 21, pages 225-239.
    6. Andrew Myburgh & Jordi Paniagua, 2016. "Does International Commercial Arbitration Promote Foreign Direct Investment?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(3), pages 597-627.
    7. James P. LeSage & Christine Thomas-Agnan, 2015. "Interpreting Spatial Econometric Origin-Destination Flow Models," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 188-208, March.
    8. Andrea De Montis & Simone Caschili & Daniele Trogu, 2014. "Spatial organization and accessibility: a study of US counties," Chapters,in: Accessibility and Spatial Interaction, chapter 6, pages 113-132 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Daniel Griffith & Manfred Fischer, 2013. "Constrained variants of the gravity model and spatial dependence: model specification and estimation issues," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 291-317, July.
    10. Paniagua, Jordi & Sapena, Juan, 2014. "Is FDI doing good? A golden rule for FDI ethics," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(5), pages 807-812.
    11. Tom Broekel & Pierre-Alexandre Balland & Martijn Burger & Frank Oort, 2014. "Modeling knowledge networks in economic geography: a discussion of four methods," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(2), pages 423-452, September.
    12. Llano, C. & De la Mata, T. & Díaz-Lanchas, J. & Gallego, N., 2017. "Transport-mode competition in intra-national trade: An empirical investigation for the Spanish case," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 334-355.
    13. James LeSage & Carlos Llano-Verduras, 2014. "Forecasting spatially dependent origin and destination commodity flows," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1543-1562, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spatial; Spatial Autocorrelation;

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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