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Spatial Effects of European Integration: Do Border Regions Benefit above Average?

  • Niebuhr, Annekatrin

    (Institute for Employment Research, Kiel)

A basic result of new economic geography (NEG) models is that the proximity to consumer markets impacts wages and employment within regions. The ongoing process of European integration, being targeted on the reduction of barriers to trade and factor mobility, has presumably changed relative market access in Europe. The present paper aims to provide some evidence on spatial effects of integration caused by declining border impediments and changing market potentials. The analysis is based on a three-region economic geography model. We focus on the impact of integration on European internal border regions and the question of whether they realise above average integration benefits. The empirical analysis concerns integration effects in the EU15 regions arising from a reduction of non-tariff and other barriers since the mid 1970s.

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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 36 (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 254-78

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:36:y:2006:i:3:p:254-78
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  1. Volker Nitsch, 2000. "National borders and international trade: evidence from the European Union," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1091-1105, November.
  2. Marius BRÜLHART & Matthieu CROZET & Pamina KOENIG, 2004. "Enlargement and the EU Periphery: The Impact of Changing Market Potential," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 04.02, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  3. Giuseppe De Arcangelis & Giordano Mion, 2002. "Spatial Externalities and Empirical Analysis: The case of Italy," Working Papers 66, Sapienza University of Rome, CIDEI.
  4. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2004. "Non-Europe : the magnitude and causes of market fragmentation in the EU," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques bla99004a, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  5. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00096285 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2006. "Market access and regional disparities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2), pages 313-334, June.
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