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An Application of the Regression Analogue of the Demographically Enhanced Shift-Share Model

  • Brox, James

    (U Waterloo)

  • Carvalho, Emanuel

    (U Waterloo)

The objective of this research is to investigate employment patterns by age-sex specific cohorts through the application of a modified version of the shift-share model and in the process incorporating the Patterson (1991) regression analogue. Are older workers becoming unemployed or encouraged to take early retirement? Has the shift to less physically demanding employment across industries benefited females? The results of this study clearly indicate that adult workers have fared better than either younger or older workers in terms of relative employment growth, suggesting that the trend towards early retirement has not significantly reduced the employment problem facing younger cohorts.

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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 36 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 239-53

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:36:y:2006:i:2:p:239-53
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  1. Anderson, Joan B. & Dimon, Denise, 1999. "Formal sector job growth and women's labor sector participation: The case of Mexico," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 169-191.
  2. Daniel Boothby & Torben Drewes, 2006. "Postsecondary Education in Canada: Returns to University, College and Trades Education," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(1), pages 1-22, March.
  3. Timmer, Marcel P. & Szirmai, Adam, 2000. "Productivity growth in Asian manufacturing: the structural bonus hypothesis examined," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 371-392, December.
  4. M.W. Danson & W.F. Lever & J.F. Malcolm, 1980. "The Inner City Employment Problem in Great Britain, 1952-76: a Shift-Share Approach," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 17(2), pages 193-209, June.
  5. Blien, Uwe & Wolf, Katja, 2002. "Regional development of employment in eastern Germany. An analysis with an econometric analogue to shift-share techniques," ERSA conference papers ersa02p263, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Hostland, D., 1995. "What factors Determine Structural Unemployment in Canada?," Papers r-96-2, Gouvernement du Canada - Human Resources Development.
  7. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1999. "Early Retirement Provisions and the Labor Force Behavior of Older Men: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 724-56, October.
  8. Cletus C. Coughlin & Patricia S. Pollard, 2001. "Comparing manufacturing export growth across states: what accounts for the differences?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 25-40.
  9. Morley Gunderson & Andrew Luchak, 2001. "Employee Preferences for Pension Plan Features ," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(4), pages 795-808, October.
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