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Econometric Issues in Education Finance

Listed author(s):
  • Ajilore, Olugbenga

    (U Toledo)

Registered author(s):

    Several econometric issues within the field of education finance that have not been fully explored to date are addressed. Focusing on demographic factors and per-pupil expenditures in the United States, an econometric model that incorporates spatial analysis is developed and a unique framework for analyzing the impact of demographics on local public demand is introduced. The results show that ethnic diversity has a negative impact on per-pupil spending, while the elderly have a positive impact.

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    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/121/71
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    Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 192-204

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    Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:36:y:2006:i:2:p:192-204
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.srsa.org

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    1. Christopher F Baum & Mark E. Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2003. "Instrumental variables and GMM: Estimation and testing," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(1), pages 1-31, March.
    2. Hanushek, Eric A & Rivkin, Steven G & Taylor, Lori L, 1996. "Aggregation and the Estimated Effects of School Resources," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 611-627, November.
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    10. J. Paul Elhorst, 2003. "Specification and Estimation of Spatial Panel Data Models," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 26(3), pages 244-268, July.
    11. James M. Poterba, 1997. "Demographic structure and the political economy of public education," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 48-66.
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    14. Harris, Amy Rehder & Evans, William N. & Schwab, Robert M., 2001. "Education spending in an aging America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 449-472, September.
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