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The Spatial Economy of Gender-Based Occupational Segregation

Author

Listed:
  • Olfert, M. Rose

    (U Saskatchewan)

  • Moebis, Dianne M.

    (Government of Nunavut)

Abstract

Occupational segregation by gender persists in spite of improvements in labor market gender equality over the past 40 years. In this paper a simple index of occupational segregation, the D-Index, computed for each of the 288 census divisions in Canada for the year 2000 is regressed on a measure of rurality, along with the standard explanations. The rurality variable is included to capture the influence of spatial variations in access to services and employment opportunities. Results indicate a strong influence of rurality, even when industrial composition is controlled for. Education attainment gaps and the presence of children are also significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Olfert, M. Rose & Moebis, Dianne M., 2006. "The Spatial Economy of Gender-Based Occupational Segregation," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 44-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:36:y:2006:i:1:p:44-62
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Nicole M. Fortin & Michael Huberman, 2002. "Occupational Gender Segregation and Women's Wages in Canada: An Historical Perspective," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(s1), pages 11-39, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Census; Employment; Gender; Segregation; Spatial;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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