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We're Right, They're Wrong, Regional Science Is Where It's At

Author

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  • Partridge, Mark D.

    (OH State U)

Abstract

Regional science is highly relevant in assessing issues that tangibly impact our lives. Conversely, economics is so fixated on mathematical rigor that it does not have the impact on policy that it should. Similar constructive criticisms apply to geography. To illustrate how regional scientists are more grounded, three examples show how their analysis can defeat popular misconceptions held by the media: (1) the role of energy resources in explaining Alberta's long run growth; (2) how the largest U.S. cities are not growing increasingly more dominant; and (3) how considering American high poverty clusters can help inform international poverty research.

Suggested Citation

  • Partridge, Mark D., 2006. "We're Right, They're Wrong, Regional Science Is Where It's At," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 1-14.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:36:y:2006:i:1:p:1-14
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    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/113/63
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2013. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), pages 570-615.
    2. Jan Eeckhout, 2004. "Gibrat's Law for (All) Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1429-1451.
    3. Rappaport, Jordan, 2004. "Why are population flows so persistent?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 554-580.
    4. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 127-138.
    5. Dwight W. Adamson & David E. Clark & Mark D. Partridge, 2004. "Do Urban Agglomeration Effects and Household Amenities have a Skill Bias?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 201-224.
    6. Niles Hansen, 2001. "Are Very Large Cities Successful? Searching for Dynamic Externalities Versus Evidence from Population Movements," International Regional Science Review, , pages 344-359.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:rre:publsh:v:43:y:2013:i:23:p:1-22 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Randall Jackson, 2015. "Are Industry Clusters and Diversity Strange Bedfellows?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2), pages 113-129, Fall.
    3. Dan S. Rickman & John V. Winters, 2015. "Ranking Authors and Institutions by Publications in Regional Science Journals: 2010-2014," Economics Working Paper Series 1603, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    4. Sara Cruz & Aurora Teixeira, 2010. "The Evolution of the Cluster Literature: Shedding Light on the Regional Studies-Regional Science Debate," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 1263-1288.
    5. Dan S. Rickman & John V. Winters, 2016. "Ranking Authors and Institutions by Publications in Regional Science Journals: 2010–2014," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 312-336, June.
    6. Mark D. Partridge, 2013. "America’s Job Crisis and the Role of Regional Economic Development Policy," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(2,3), pages 97-110, Winter.
    7. Randall Jackson, 2015. "Fellows Address: Are Industry Clusters and Diversity Strange Bedfellows?," Working Papers Working Paper 2015-04, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy; Geography; Regional; Resources;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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