IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

The Effects of Industry Instability on Sector Entry: The Case of Maine

  • Gabe, Todd M.

    (U ME)

This paper investigates the effects of industry instability on the entry decisions of a large sample of Maine establishments. Instability is represented by the persistence of industry employment in Maine, measured over 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month intervals. Poisson regression results suggest that the employment persistence measures have a positive effect on the number of establishments that began operations per industry. This suggests that, other things being equal, entrants are attracted to sectors with high regional employment stability.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 35 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 64-79

in new window

Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:35:y:2005:i:1:p:64-79
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Geroski, P. A., 1995. "What do we know about entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 421-440, December.
  2. Michael E. Porter, 2000. "Location, Competition, and Economic Development: Local Clusters in a Global Economy," Economic Development Quarterly, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, vol. 14(1), pages 15-34, February.
  3. Dixit, Avinash, 1997. "Investment and Employment Dynamics in the Short Run and the Long Run," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(1), pages 1-20, January.
  4. David B. Audretsch, 1995. "Innovation and Industry Evolution," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011468, December.
  5. Paulo Guimaraes & Octavio Figueiredo & Douglas Woodward, 2000. "A tractable approach to the firm location decision problem," NIMA Working Papers 2, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
  6. Kessides, Ioannis N, 1986. "Advertising, Sunk Costs, and Barriers to Entry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 84-95, February.
  7. Dale Orr, 1974. "The Economic Determinants of Entry into Canadian Banking: 1963-7," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 7(1), pages 82-99, February.
  8. Cochrane, John H, 1988. "How Big Is the Random Walk in GNP?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(5), pages 893-920, October.
  9. Pindyck, Robert S, 1988. "Irreversible Investment, Capacity Choice, and the Value of the Firm," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 969-85, December.
  10. Christopher Fawson & Dawn Thilmany & John E. Keith, 1998. "Employment Stability and the Role of Sectoral Dominance in Rural Economies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 521-533.
  11. Smith, Stephen M. & Gibson, Cosette M., 1988. "Industrial Diversification In Nonmetropolitan Counties And Its Effect On Economic Stability," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 13(02), December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:35:y:2005:i:1:p:64-79. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark L. Burkey)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.