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Education and Nonmetropolitan Income Growth in the South


  • Henry, Mark

    (Clemson U)

  • Barkley, David

    (Clemson U)

  • Li, Haizhen

    (Clemson U)


This research evaluates the effects of higher stocks of human capital (measured by the share of adults with some college) on growth in county per capita income using a Mankiw, Romer, and Weil type model adjusted for spatial dependence and capital stocks. Regressions based on county data from the 1970-2000 censuses for the 15 southern states indicate that metro counties realized more of a growth premium from added human capital than nonmetro counties. With nonmetro counties, service-based counties generally fared best from enhanced human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry, Mark & Barkley, David & Li, Haizhen, 2004. "Education and Nonmetropolitan Income Growth in the South," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(3), pages 223-244.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:34:y:2004:i:3:p:223-44

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. anonymous, 1995. "Does the bouncing ball lead to economic growth?," Regional Update, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 1-2,4-6.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 121-144, May.
    3. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    4. Jordan Rappaport, 1999. "Local Growth Empirics," CID Working Papers 23, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    5. James M. Poterba, 1997. "Demographic structure and the political economy of public education," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 48-66.
    6. Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1997. "Transfers, Social Safety Nets, and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 81-102, March.
    7. Ladd, Helen F. & Murray, Sheila E., 2001. "Intergenerational conflict reconsidered: county demographic structure and the demand for public education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 343-357, August.
    8. Barkley, David L. & Henry, Mark S. & Bao, Shuming, 1998. "The Role of Local School Quality in Rural Employment and Population Growth," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(1), pages 81-102, Summer.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elena G. Irwin & Andrew M. Isserman & Maureen Kilkenny & Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "A Century of Research on Rural Development and Regional Issues," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(2), pages 522-553.
    2. M. Rose Olfert & Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "Best Practices in Twenty-First-Century Rural Development and Policy," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 147-164.

    More about this item


    Education; Human Capital; Spatial;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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