IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/rre/publsh/v34y2004i2p156-71.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Interregional Migration in Spain: A Semiparametric Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Maza, Adolfo

    (U Cantabria)

  • Villaverde, Jose

    (U Cantabria)

Abstract

This paper analyses the determinants of internal migration in Spain between 1995 and 2002. After a brief descriptive study, we present an analytical model of internal migration flows. Subsequently, we estimate this model by applying semiparametric techniques. The general conclusion that we come to is that net migration rates are influenced mainly by income and climatic condition differentials between the regions of origin and destination; in addition, unemployment and housing price differentials seem to have a much weaker effect while variables such as aggregate unemployment, on the one hand, and human capital and population density differentials, on the other, do not affect net migration rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Maza, Adolfo & Villaverde, Jose, 2004. "Interregional Migration in Spain: A Semiparametric Analysis," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2), pages 156-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:34:y:2004:i:2:p:156-71
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/84/35
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jörg Decressin, 1994. "Internal migration in West Germany and implications for East-West salary convergence," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 130(2), pages 231-257, June.
    2. Bentolila, Samuel, 1997. "Sticky labor in Spanish regions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 591-598, April.
    3. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    4. Thomas Aronsson & Johan Lundberg & Magnus Wikstrom, 2001. "Regional Income Growth and Net Migration in Sweden, 1970-1995," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 823-830.
    5. Jimeno, Juan F. & Bentolila, Samuel, 1998. "Regional unemployment persistence (Spain, 1976-1994)," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 25-51, March.
    6. Li, Qi & Stengos, Thanasis, 1996. "Semiparametric estimation of partially linear panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 389-397.
    7. Glaeser, Edward L & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1126-1152, December.
      • Edward L. Glaeser & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1991. "Growth in Cities," NBER Working Papers 3787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    8. Antolin, Pablo & Bover, Olympia, 1997. "Regional Migration in Spain: The Effect of Personal Characteristics and of Unemployment, Wage and House Price Differentials Using Pooled Cross-Sections," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 59(2), pages 215-235, May.
    9. Pissarides, Christopher A & McMaster, Ian, 1990. "Regional Migration, Wages and Unemployment: Empirical Evidence and Implications for Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(4), pages 812-831, October.
    10. Fan, Yanqin & Ullah, Aman, 1999. "Asymptotic Normality of a Combined Regression Estimator," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 191-240, November.
    11. Jackman, Richard & Savouri, Savvas, 1992. "Regional Migration in Britain: An Analysis of Gross Flows Using NHS Central Register Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(415), pages 1433-1450, November.
    12. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 1997. "The Dispersion of US State Unemployment Rates: The Role of Market and Non-market Equilibrium Factors," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(6), pages 593-606.
    13. Treyz, George I, et al, 1993. "The Dynamics of U.S. Internal Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(2), pages 209-214, May.
    14. Shields, Gail M & Shields, Michael P, 1989. " The Emergence of Migration Theory and a Suggested New Direction," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 277-304.
    15. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Adolfo Maza, 2006. "Migrations and Regional Convergence: The Case of Spain," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 26(2), pages 191-202, October.
    2. Mitze, Timo & Reinkowski, Janina, 2010. "Testing the Neoclassical Migration Model: Overall and Age-Group Specific Results for German Regions," Ruhr Economic Papers 226, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Clemente, Jesús & Larramona, Gemma & Olmos, Lorena, 2013. "Interregional migration and thresholds: evidence in Spain," MPRA Paper 47631, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Celia Melguizo & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "What drives migration moves across urban areas in Spain? Evidence from the Great Recession," Working Papers XREAP2017-03, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Oct 2017.
    5. María Hierro, 2009. "Modelling the dynamics of internal migration flows in Spain," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(3), pages 683-692, August.
    6. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:3:p:571-602 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. María Hierro & Adolfo Maza, 2010. "Per capita income convergence and internal migration in Spain: Are foreign-born migrants playing an important role?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(1), pages 89-107, March.
    8. Björn Alecke & Timo Mitze & Gerhard Untiedt, 2010. "Internal migration, regional labour market dynamics and implications for German East-West disparities: results from a Panel VAR," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 30(2), pages 159-189, September.
    9. Celia Melguizo Cháfe & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "“What drives migration moves across urban areas in Spain?. Evidence from the Great Recession”," AQR Working Papers 201709, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Sep 2017.
    10. Maza, Adolfo & Villaverde, Jose, 2008. "A Note on the Need to Account for Spatial Dependence: A Case of Migratory Flows in Spain," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 38(1), pages 105-111.
    11. Mitze, Timo & Reinkowski, Janina, 2010. "Testing the Validity of the Neoclassical Migration Model: Overall and Age-Group Specific Estimation Results for German Spatial Planning Regions," MPRA Paper 23616, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Mulhern, Alan & Watson, John, 2009. "Spanish internal migration: is there anything new to say?," Economics Discussion Papers 2009-1, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
    13. Maza, Adolfo & Villaverde, Jose, 2007. "A state-space approach to the analysis of economic shocks in Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 55-63.
    14. Timo MITZE & Björn ALECKE & Gerhard UNTIEDT, "undated". "Determinants of Interregional Migration Among German States and its Implications for Reducing East-West Disparities: Results from a Panel VAR Using Efficient GMM Estimation," EcoMod2008 23800089, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:34:y:2004:i:2:p:156-71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher Yencha). General contact details of provider: http://www.srsa.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.