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The Geographic Mobility of Displaced Workers: Do Local Employment Conditions Matter?

  • Yankow, Jeffrey J.

    (Furman U)

Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and County Business Patterns, this study investigates whether displaced workers adjust their job search strategies in response to local market conditions to favor migration out of declining labor markets. Empirical results from a Cox partial-likelihood proportional hazards model are supportive. A low density of local employment and low average wage levels are associated with shorter wait times to migration. Conversely, high local employment growth rates, high wages, and low unemployment rates correlate with an increased likelihood of obtaining local employment following displacement.

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Article provided by Southern Regional Science Association in its journal Review of Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 34 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 120-36

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Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:34:y:2004:i:2:p:120-36
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  1. Fallick, Bruce Chelimsky, 1993. "The Industrial Mobility of Displaced Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 302-23, April.
  2. Henry W. Herzog Jr. & Alan M. Schlottmann, 1984. "Labor Force Mobility in the United States: Migration, Unemployment, and Remigration," International Regional Science Review, SAGE Publishing, vol. 9(1), pages 43-58, September.
  3. Jacob Mincer, 1977. "Family Migration Decisions," NBER Working Papers 0199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Stacey L. Schreft & Aarti Singh, 2003. "A closer look at jobless recoveries," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 45-73.
  5. Boehm, Thomas P. & Herzog, Jr., Henry W. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 1998. "Does Migration Matter? Job Search Outcomes for the Unemployed," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(1), pages 3-12, Summer.
  6. Maxwell, Nan L & D'Amico, Ronald J, 1986. "Employment and Wage Effects of Involuntary Job Separation: Male-Female Differences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 373-77, May.
  7. DaVanzo, Julie, 1978. "Does Unemployment Affect Migration?-Evidence from Micro Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(4), pages 504-14, November.
  8. William J. Carrington, 1993. "Wage Losses for Displaced Workers: Is It Really the Firm That Matters?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 435-462.
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