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Knowledge Spillovers, Agglomeration Economies, and the Geography of Innovation Activity: A Spatial Econometric Analysis


  • Lim, Up

    (U TX)


This paper investigates the extent to which innovative activity in a metropolitan area is affected by knowledge spillovers in the neighboring metropolitan areas as well as in the metropolitan area itself. The spatial econometric analysis shows that innovative activity in a metropolitan area is positively affected by both specialization and diversity externalities in high technology industries in the metropolitan area, and that there also exist geographic knowledge spillovers across metropolitan boundaries. In addition, this study finds that high technology specialization externalities are more localized than high technology diversity externalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Lim, Up, 2004. "Knowledge Spillovers, Agglomeration Economies, and the Geography of Innovation Activity: A Spatial Econometric Analysis," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1), pages 11-36.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:34:y:2004:i:1:p:11-36

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Feldman, Maryann P. & Audretsch, David B., 1999. "Innovation in cities:: Science-based diversity, specialization and localized competition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 409-429, February.
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    6. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
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    9. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Patent Statistics as Economic Indicators: A Survey," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 287-343 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    13. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Edward Nissan & George Carter, 2009. "Specialization of state sectoral employment," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 33(2), pages 148-160, April.
    2. Haifeng Qian & Kingsley Haynes, 2014. "Beyond innovation: the Small Business Innovation Research program as entrepreneurship policy," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 524-543, August.
    3. Nissan, Edward & Carter, George, 2010. "States' Nonagricultural Employment at the 3-Digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Level," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1).
    4. Shu-Hen Chiang, 2014. "The dilemma of "Twin Cities": is the suburban dependence hypothesis applicable?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 149-163, June.

    More about this item


    Geography; Innovation; Knowledge; Spatial; Technology;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis


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