IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/pio/envirc/v30y2012i4p591-612.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Governing climate change transnationally: assessing the evidence from a database of sixty initiatives

Author

Listed:
  • Harriet Bulkeley
  • Liliana Andonova
  • Karin Bäckstrand
  • Michele Betsill
  • Daniel Compagnon
  • Rosaleen Duffy
  • Ans Kolk
  • Matthew Hoffmann
  • David Levy
  • Peter Newell
  • Tori Milledge
  • Matthew Paterson
  • Philipp Pattberg
  • Stacy VanDeveer

Abstract

With this paper we present an analysis of sixty transnational governance initiatives and assess the implications for our understanding of the roles of public and private actors, the legitimacy of governance ‘beyond’ the state, and the North–South dimensions of governing climate change. In the first part of the paper we examine the notion of transnational governance and its applicability in the climate change arena, reflecting on the history and emergence of transnational governance initiatives in this issue area and key areas of debate. In the second part of the paper we present the findings from the database and its analysis. Focusing on three core issues, the roles of public and private actors in governing transnationally, the functions that such initiatives perform, and the ways in which accountability for governing global environmental issues might be achieved, we suggest that significant distinctions are emerging in the universe of transnational climate governance which may have considerable implications for the governing of global environmental issues. In conclusion, we reflect on these findings and the subsequent consequences for the governance of climate change. Keywords: climate change, governance, transnational, private authority, public, legitimacy

Suggested Citation

  • Harriet Bulkeley & Liliana Andonova & Karin Bäckstrand & Michele Betsill & Daniel Compagnon & Rosaleen Duffy & Ans Kolk & Matthew Hoffmann & David Levy & Peter Newell & Tori Milledge & Matthew Paters, 2012. "Governing climate change transnationally: assessing the evidence from a database of sixty initiatives," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(4), pages 591-612, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envirc:v:30:y:2012:i:4:p:591-612
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=c11126
    File Function: abstract
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/C.html for details

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/epc/fulltext/c30/c11126.pdf
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/C.html for details

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Naghmeh Nasiritousi & Mattias Hjerpe & Björn-Ola Linnér, 2016. "The roles of non-state actors in climate change governance: understanding agency through governance profiles," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 109-126, February.
    2. Dryzek, John S. & Pickering, Jonathan, 2017. "Deliberation as a catalyst for reflexive environmental governance," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 353-360.
    3. Albana Kona & Paolo Bertoldi & Şiir Kılkış, 2019. "Covenant of Mayors: Local Energy Generation, Methodology, Policies and Good Practice Examples," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(6), pages 1-29, March.
    4. Howard, Rebecca Joy & Tallontire, Anne & Stringer, Lindsay & Marchant, Rob, 2015. "Unraveling the Notion of “Fair Carbon”: Key Challenges for Standards Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 343-356.
    5. David Horan, 2019. "A New Approach to Partnerships for SDG Transformations," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(18), pages 1-22, September.
    6. Sander Chan & Robert Falkner & Harro van Asselt & Matthew Goldberg, 2015. "Strengthening non-state climate action: a progress assessment of commitments launched at the 2014 UN Climate Summit," GRI Working Papers 216, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    7. Naghmeh Nasiritousi & Mattias Hjerpe & Björn-Ola Linnér, 2016. "The roles of non-state actors in climate change governance: understanding agency through governance profiles," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 109-126, February.
    8. Jean-Frédéric Morin, 2020. "Concentration despite competition: The organizational ecology of technical assistance providers," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 75-107, January.
    9. Brendan Guy, 2014. "Re-conceptualising Commitments to Sustainable Development in the 21st Century – Nurturing Action and Accountability in the Networked World," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(2), pages 223-244.
    10. Castán Broto, Vanesa, 2017. "Urban Governance and the Politics of Climate change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 1-15.
    11. Paolo De Pascali & Annamaria Bagaini, 2018. "Energy Transition and Urban Planning for Local Development. A Critical Review of the Evolution of Integrated Spatial and Energy Planning," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(1), pages 1-21, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pio:envirc:v:30:y:2012:i:4:p:591-612. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Neil Hammond) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Neil Hammond to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://www.pion.co.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.