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Sharing the gains of local economic growth: race-to-the-top versus race-to-the-bottom economic development

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Listed:
  • Stephan J Goetz
  • Mark D Partridge
  • Dan S Rickman
  • Shibalee Majumdar

Abstract

In attempting to promote economic development, states often pursue either a race-to-the-bottom approach focused on lowering business costs or a more investment-based, race-to-the-top approach that aims to increase productivity, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Whether either approach promotes growth and produces broad-based economic gains across the population is the subject of this paper. The novelty of our approach is that an extensive array of variables representing examples of the two economic development approaches are examined for their effects on various indicators of state economic performance, including income distribution, over the 2000 – 07 period. We find that lower taxes are statistically insignificant in explaining state economic performance, and that targeted tax incentives and financial assistance—as currently practised—are more likely to harm growth and income inequality. Some support exists for state and local governments to encourage entrepreneurship and to enhance Internet connectivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan J Goetz & Mark D Partridge & Dan S Rickman & Shibalee Majumdar, 2011. "Sharing the gains of local economic growth: race-to-the-top versus race-to-the-bottom economic development," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 29(3), pages 428-456, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envirc:v:29:y:2011:i:3:p:428-456
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    Cited by:

    1. Rickman, Dan S. & Wang, Hongbo, 2018. "Two tales of two U.S. states: Regional fiscal austerity and economic performance," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 46-55.
    2. repec:bla:ijurrs:v:41:y:2017:i:6:p:997-1009 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Patrick, Carlianne, 2016. "Jobless capital? The role of capital subsidies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 169-179.
    4. Richard Funderburg & Timothy J. Bartik & Alan H. Peters & Peter S. Fisher, 2013. "The Impact Of Marginal Business Taxes On State Manufacturing," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 557-582, October.
    5. Michael R. Betz & Mark D. Partridge & David S. Kraybill & Linda Lobao, 2012. "Why Do Localities Provide Economic Development Incentives? Geographic Competition, Political Constituencies, and Government Capacity," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 361-391, September.
    6. John B Parr, 2015. "Neglected aspects of regional policy: a retrospective view," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(2), pages 376-392, April.
    7. Dan S. Rickman & Mouhcine Guettabi, 2015. "The Great Recession And Nonmetropolitan America," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 93-112, January.
    8. Dan S. Rickman, 2013. "Should Oklahoma Be More Like Texas? A Taxing Decision," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 1-22, Summer.
    9. Alessandra Faggian & Mark Partridge & Edward J. Malecki, 2017. "Creating an Environment for Economic Growth: Creativity, Entrepreneurship or Human Capital?," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(6), pages 997-1009, November.
    10. Raul Gouvea & Jonathan Linton & Manuel Montoya & Steven Walsh, 2012. "Emerging Technologies and Ethics: A Race-to-the-Bottom or the Top?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 109(4), pages 553-567, September.
    11. Rickman, Dan S. & Wang, Hongbo & Winters, John V., 2017. "Is shale development drilling holes in the human capital pipeline?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 283-290.
    12. Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2011. "The Winners' Choice: Sustainable Economic Strategies for Successful 21st-Century Regions," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 143-178.
    13. Goetz, Stephan J. & Fleming, David A. & Rupasingha, Anil, 2012. "The Economic Impacts of Self-Employment," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 44(3), pages 1-7, August.
    14. Carlianne Patrick, 2014. "The economic development incentives game: an imperfect information, heterogeneous communities approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(1), pages 137-156, August.
    15. Neil Reid & Michael C. Carroll & Xinyue Ye, 2013. "The Great Recession of 2007-2009," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(2), pages 87-89, May.
    16. Neil Lee & Stephen Clarke, 2017. "Who gains from high-tech growth? High-technology multipliers, employment and wages in Britain," SPRU Working Paper Series 2017-14, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School.
    17. repec:rre:publsh:v48:y:2018:i:1:p:93-117 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Neil Lee & Paul Sissons, 2016. "Inclusive growth? The relationship between economic growth and poverty in British cities," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 48(11), pages 2317-2339, November.
    19. Jason P. Brown & Stephan J. Goetz & Mary C. Ahearn & Chyi-lyi (Kathleen) Liang, 2014. "Linkages Between Community-Focused Agriculture, Farm Sales, and Regional Growth," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 28(1), pages 5-16, February.
    20. Lee, Neil & Clarke, Stephen, 2019. "Do low-skilled workers gain from high-tech employment growth? High-technology multipliers, employment and wages in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100926, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Anil Rupasingha & Stephan J. Goetz, 2013. "Self-employment and local economic performance: Evidence from US counties," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 92(1), pages 141-161, March.
    22. Xiaobing Shuai, 2015. "Do Economic Development Efforts Benefit All? Business Attraction and Income Inequality," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 35-56, Spring.
    23. Rickman, Dan S. & Wang, Hongbo, 2018. "What Goes Up Must Come Down? A Case Study of the Recent Oil and Gas Employment Cycle in Louisiana, North Dakota and Oklahoma," MPRA Paper 87252, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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