IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/pio/envirb/v38y2011i4p678-705.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Anything, anywhere, anytime? Developing indicators to assess the spatial and temporal fragmentation of activities

Author

Listed:
  • Bayarma Alexander
  • Christa Hubers
  • Tim Schwanen
  • Martin Dijst
  • Dick Ettema

Abstract

Developments in transportation and information and communication technologies (ICTs) have facilitated the process labeled activity fragmentation . In this process, the weakened associations between activity, time, and place that ICTs made possible facilitate the disintegration of activities into smaller subtasks, which can then be performed at different times and at different locations. However, until now discussion of the fragmentation of activity hypothesis has been limited to the theoretical domain and largely absent from the empirical domain. In the study reported here we connect both domains by (1) developing a set of measures of activity fragmentation and (2) applying them to study the fragmentation of the activity of paid work using combined activity, travel, and communication diary data collected in the Netherlands in 2007 in order to assess the performance of these indicators. The results show that the indicators differentiate between the multiple facets of activity fragmentation (such as the number, dispersion, and configuration of fragments). The preliminary analyses also suggest that, although the temporal fragmentation of activities appears to be or to have become more common, spatial activity fragmentation is rather limited.

Suggested Citation

  • Bayarma Alexander & Christa Hubers & Tim Schwanen & Martin Dijst & Dick Ettema, 2011. "Anything, anywhere, anytime? Developing indicators to assess the spatial and temporal fragmentation of activities," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 38(4), pages 678-705, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envirb:v:38:y:2011:i:4:p:678-705
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=b35132
    File Function: abstract
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/B.html for details

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/epb/fulltext/b38/b35132.pdf
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/B.html for details

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2012. "The Personal City: The Experimental, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt67d5w48s, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Pascal Pochet & Patricia Lejoux & Minming Chen, 2017. "Les actifs à mobilité atypique pour le travail à travers l’Enquête déplacements régionale Rhône-Alpes 2012-2015
      [Les actifs à mobilité atypique pour le travail à travers l'Enquête déplacements régi
      ," Working Papers halshs-01702558, HAL.
    3. Ben-Elia, Eran & Alexander, Bayarma & Hubers, Christa & Ettema, Dick, 2014. "Activity fragmentation, ICT and travel: An exploratory Path Analysis of spatiotemporal interrelationships," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 56-74.
    4. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2013. "The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7014d9cg, University of California Transportation Center.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pio:envirb:v:38:y:2011:i:4:p:678-705. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Neil Hammond). General contact details of provider: http://www.pion.co.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.