IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/pio/envirb/v36y2009i4p711-724.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Evolution of the second-story city: the Minneapolis Skyway System

Author

Listed:
  • Michael J Corbett
  • Feng Xie
  • David Levinson

Abstract

This research describes the growth of the Minneapolis Skyway network and aims to determine if the growth of the system has followed a predictable path. We hypothesize that the system expanded to the places in which it was valued the most. The point accessibility of each block lying within and adjacent to the connected system for each expansion year is calculated and used to predict the expansion of the Skyway System. In order to determine how often the expansion connected the blocks with higher accessibility, a connection-choice logit model relating the probability of joining the network (in a given year) to accessibility measures and network size was employed. The results disclose that accessibility is a significant explanatory factor of network growth. In accordance with the findings from the logit model, a network-growth simulation model was then developed on the basis of the strongest-link assumption (ie for a link to be constructed, it must be ranked the highest in terms of increasing accessibility between the two blocks it connects). The results show that the simulation model performs well in predicting the sequence of skyway additions on the basis of the myopic strongest-link assumption. This suggests that—although various physical, economic, regulatory, and legal factors may have played a role—accessibility remains an important factor in predicting which links are connected during the growth of the Minneapolis Skyway network.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael J Corbett & Feng Xie & David Levinson, 2009. "Evolution of the second-story city: the Minneapolis Skyway System," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(4), pages 711-724, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envirb:v:36:y:2009:i:4:p:711-724
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=b34066
    File Function: abstract
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/B.html for details

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/epb/fulltext/b36/b34066.pdf
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/B.html for details

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Feng Yang & Feng Qian & Wanzhu Zhao, 2016. "Towards a Climate-Responsive Vertical Pedestrian System: An Empirical Study on an Elevated Walkway in Shanghai China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-15, August.
    2. Feng Xie & David Levinson, 2010. "How streetcars shaped suburbanization: a Granger causality analysis of land use and transit in the Twin Cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 453-470, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pio:envirb:v:36:y:2009:i:4:p:711-724. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Neil Hammond). General contact details of provider: http://www.pion.co.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.