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Cellular automata and urban simulation: where do we go from here?


  • Paul M Torrens
  • David O'Sullivan


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  • Paul M Torrens & David O'Sullivan, 2001. "Cellular automata and urban simulation: where do we go from here?," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 28(2), pages 163-168, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envirb:v:28:y:2001:i:2:p:163-168

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alex Anas & Richard Arnott & Kenneth A. Small, 1998. "Urban Spatial Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1426-1464, September.
    2. Lucien Benguigui & Daniel Czamanski & Maria Marinov, 2001. "City Growth as a Leap-frogging Process: An Application to the Tel-Aviv Metropolis," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 38(10), pages 1819-1839, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Claes & Hellervik, Alexander & Lindgren, Kristian, 2005. "A spatial network explanation for a hierarchy of urban power laws," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 345(1), pages 227-244.
    2. Meisam Jafari & Hamid Majedi & Seyed Masoud Monavari & Ali Asghar Alesheikh & Mirmasoud Kheirkhah Zarkesh, 2016. "Dynamic Simulation of Urban Expansion Based on Cellular Automata and Logistic Regression Model: Case Study of the Hyrcanian Region of Iran," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-18, August.
    3. Torrens, Paul M., 2001. "New Tools for Simulating Housing Choices," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt6qs0w2w1, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    4. Wolfgang Wagner, 2004. "A Simulation of Segregation in Cities and its Application for the Analysis of Rent Control," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 71, Universität Potsdam, Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    5. Michael Iacono & David Levinson & Ahmed El-Geneidy, 2007. "Models of Transportation and Land Use Change: A Guide to the Territory," Working Papers 200805, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    6. Wolfgang Wagner, 2004. "A simulation of segregation in cities and its application for the analysis of price regulation," ERSA conference papers ersa04p687, European Regional Science Association.
    7. repec:eee:ecomod:v:212:y:2008:i:3:p:359-371 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Wolfgang Wagner, 2004. "Spatial Patterns of Segregation: A Simulation of the Impact of Externalities between Households," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 69, Universität Potsdam, Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    9. Stefano Balbi & Carlo Giupponi, 2009. "Reviewing agent-based modelling of socio-ecosystems: a methodology for the analysis of climate change adaptation and sustainability," Working Papers 2009_15, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".

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