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Placing neoliberalism: the rise and fall of Ireland’s Celtic Tiger

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  • Rob Kitchin
  • Cian OâCallaghan
  • Justin Gleeson
  • Karen Keaveney

Abstract

In this paper we provide an account of the property-led boom and bust which has brought Ireland to the point of bankruptcy. Our account details the pivotal role which neoliberal policy played in guiding the course of the country’s recent history, but also heightens awareness of the how the Irish case might, in turn, instruct and illuminate mappings and explanations of neoliberalism’s concrete histories and geographies. To this end, we begin by scrutinising the terms and conditions under which the Irish state might usefully be regarded as neoliberal. Attention is then given to uncovering the causes of the Irish property bubble, the housing oversupply it created, and the proposed solution to this oversupply. In the conclusion we draw attention to the contributions which our case study might make to the wider literature of critical human geographies of neoliberalism, forwarding three concepts which emerge from the Irish story which may have wider resonance, and might constitute a useful fleshing out of theoretical framings of concrete and particular neoliberalisms: path amplification, neoliberalism’s topologies and topographies, and accumulation by repossession. Keywords: Ireland, financial crisis, Celtic Tiger, housing, National Assets Management Agency, ghost estates, neoliberalism, path amplification, accumulation by repossession, neoliberal topographies

Suggested Citation

  • Rob Kitchin & Cian OâCallaghan & Justin Gleeson & Karen Keaveney, 2012. "Placing neoliberalism: the rise and fall of Ireland’s Celtic Tiger," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 44(6), pages 1302-1326, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:44:y:2012:i:6:p:1302-1326
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michelle Norris & Michael Byrne, 2016. "Social housing's role in the Irish property boom and bust," Working Papers 201615, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    2. Dominik Bernhofer & Octavio Fernández-Amador & Martin Gächter & Friedrich Sindermann, 2014. "Finance, potential output and the business cycle," Chapters,in: Financial Cycles and the Real Economy, chapter 14, pages 235-264 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Marco Bontje & Philip Lawton, 2013. "Mobile policies and shifting contexts: city-regional competitiveness strategies in Amsterdam and Dublin," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 104(4), pages 397-409, September.
    4. Michelle Norris & Michael Byrne, 2017. "Housing Market Volatility,Stability and Social Rented Housing: comparing Austria and Ireland during the global financial crisis," Working Papers 201705, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    5. Katia Attuyer, 2015. "When Conflict Strikes: Contesting Neoliberal Urbanism outside Participatory Structures in Inner-city Dublin," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 807-823, July.
    6. Michael Byrne, 2016. "‘Asset Price Urbanism’ and Financialization after the Crisis: Ireland's National Asset Management Agency," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(1), pages 31-45, January.
    7. repec:bla:ijurrs:v:41:y:2017:i:5:p:804-820 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Rock, Sarah & Ahern, Aoife & Caulfield, Brian, 2016. "The economic boom, bust and transport inequity in suburban Dublin, Ireland," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 32-43.
    9. Rob Kitchin & Cian O'Callaghan & Justin Gleeson, 2014. "The New Ruins of Ireland? Unfinished Estates in the Post-Celtic Tiger Era," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 1069-1080, May.

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