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How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes

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  • Nick Bailey

Abstract

Although there is strong evidence that segregation on socioeconomic lines has risen in many countries over the last few decades, comparatively little is known about the processes by which this happens. While it is often assumed that selective migration is the dominant process, this has rarely been demonstrated. This paper proposes a more comprehensive framework to analyse processes driving changes in segregation—a ‘neighbourhood accounts’ framework. The framework is tested using data from the Scottish Longitudinal Study for 1991 – 2001, focusing on the working-age population. Contrary to what many have assumed, selective migration is shown to have only a very weak impact on changes in spatial segregation, and is certainly not the dominant factor—at least in this particular context. The effects of ageing or cohort replacement and of uneven rates of status change or social mobility appear much more important. This raises important issues for policies to tackle segregation. Keywords: spatial segregation, neighbourhood change, neighbourhood dynamics, selective migration, residential mobility, Scottish Longitudinal Study

Suggested Citation

  • Nick Bailey, 2012. "How spatial segregation changes over time: sorting out the sorting processes," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 44(3), pages 705-722, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:44:y:2012:i:3:p:705-722
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    1. Nijkamp, P. & Spronk, J., 1978. "Interactive multiple goal programming," Serie Research Memoranda 0003, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    2. Blommestein, H.J. & Nijkamp, P., 1981. "Soft spatial econometric causality models," Serie Research Memoranda 0020, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:48:y:1954:i:03:p:787-792_00 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Zwiers, Merle & Kleinhans, Reinout & van Ham, Maarten, 2015. "Divided Cities: Increasing Socio-Spatial Polarization within Large Cities in the Netherlands," IZA Discussion Papers 8882, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Green, Mark A. & Subramanian, S.V. & Vickers, Daniel & Dorling, Danny, 2015. "Internal migration, area effects and health: Does where you move to impact upon your health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 136, pages 27-34.
    3. Tunstall, Helena & Mitchell, Richard & Pearce, Jamie & Shortt, Niamh, 2014. "The general and mental health of movers to more- and less-disadvantaged socio-economic and physical environments within the UK," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 97-107.
    4. Zwiers, Merle & van Ham, Maarten & Manley, David, 2016. "Trajectories of Neighborhood Change: Spatial Patterns of Increasing Ethnic Diversity," IZA Discussion Papers 10216, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0606-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Zwiers, Merle & Bolt, Gideon & van Ham, Maarten & van Kempen, Ronald, 2014. "Neighborhood Decline and the Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 8749, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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