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Elite knowledges: framing risk and the geographies of credit


  • Thomas Wainwright


This paper examines the history of credit scoring in Britain, and how this technology was imported from the US and adapted by the British retail banking sector. It seeks to highlight the elites who develop the social codes embedded within credit scoring software, to offer insight into the complex techno-economic networks that produce the geographies of financial inclusion, exclusion, and differential risk pricing. It is argued that the scientific status of these systems is questionable, due to the social interactions involved within the statistical modelling. Finally, the paper suggests that the spaces of credit are fluid, based upon the frequent social recalibrations of these models.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Wainwright, 2011. "Elite knowledges: framing risk and the geographies of credit," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 43(3), pages 650-665, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:43:y:2011:i:3:p:650-665

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    References listed on IDEAS

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