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Ethno-religious categories and measuring occupational attainment in relation to education in England and Wales: a multilevel analysis

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  • Ron Johnston
  • Ibrahim Sirkeci
  • Nabil Khattab
  • Tariq Modood

Abstract

It has been suggested that ‘ethnic penalties’ exist in British labour markets, whereby members of ethnic minority groups fail to get into occupations commensurate with their qualifications. Often these analyses of occupational attainment by education treat minority groups as homogeneous, not recognising that in several there is substantial heterogeneity on other criteria, such as religion, which may also influence occupational attainment. We argue that there are significant variations among these ethno-religious minorities regarding their labour-market performance, which is measured using a continuous scale of skill-level distances—a measure of returns to education.

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  • Ron Johnston & Ibrahim Sirkeci & Nabil Khattab & Tariq Modood, 2010. "Ethno-religious categories and measuring occupational attainment in relation to education in England and Wales: a multilevel analysis," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(3), pages 578-591, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:42:y:2010:i:3:p:578-591
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    Cited by:

    1. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Necla Acik & Bradley Saunders, 2014. "Discriminatory labour market experiences of A8 national high skilled workers in the UK," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2014(1402), pages 17-31, September.
    3. Carolina V. Zuccotti & Harry Ganzeboom & Ayse Guveli, 2014. "Was migrating beneficial? Comparing social mobility of Turks in Western Europe to Turks in Turkey and Western European natives," DoQSS Working Papers 14-06, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    4. Dogus Simsek, 2013. "Experiences of Turkish Cypriot, Kurdish and Turkish Youth in Creating Transnational Social Spaces in London Schools," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2013(1302), pages 15-27, July.
    5. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Necla Acik & Bradley Saunders, 2014. "Discriminatory labour market experiences of A8 national high skilled workers in the UK," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 4(1-2), pages 17-31, September.
    6. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2013. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK’s minority and majority ethnic groups," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2013-08, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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