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Deprivation, diet, and food-retail access: findings from the Leeds 'food deserts' study

Author

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  • Neil Wrigley
  • Daniel Warm
  • Barrie Margetts

Abstract

Within a context of public policy debate in the United Kingdom on social exclusion, health inequalities, and food poverty, the metaphor of the 'food desert' caught the imagination of those involved in policy development. Drawing from a major cross-disciplinary investigation of food access and food poverty in British cities, the authors report in this paper findings from the first 'before/after' study of food consumption in a highly deprived area of a British city experiencing a sudden and significant change in its food-retail access. The study has been viewed as the first opportunity in the United Kingdom to assess the impact of a non-healthcare intervention (specifically a retail-provision intervention) on food-consumption patterns, and by extension diet-related health, in such a deprived, previously poor-retail-access community. The paper offers evidence of a positive but modest impact of the retail intervention on diet, and the authors discuss the ways in which their findings are potentially significant in the context of policy debate.

Suggested Citation

  • Neil Wrigley & Daniel Warm & Barrie Margetts, 2003. "Deprivation, diet, and food-retail access: findings from the Leeds 'food deserts' study," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(1), pages 151-188, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:35:y:2003:i:1:p:151-188
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrews, Margaret S. & Bhatta, Rhea & Ver Ploeg, Michele, 2012. "Did the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Increase in SNAP Benefits Reduce the Impact of Food Deserts?," 2012 AAEA/EAAE Food Environment Symposium, May 30-31, Boston, MA 123520, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. repec:got:cegedp:66 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Caspi, Caitlin E. & Kawachi, Ichiro & Subramanian, S.V. & Adamkiewicz, Gary & Sorensen, Glorian, 2012. "The relationship between diet and perceived and objective access to supermarkets among low-income housing residents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(7), pages 1254-1262.
    4. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Ver Ploeg, Michele & Kasteridis, Panagiotis & Yen, Steven T., 2014. "The roles of food prices and food access in determining food purchases of low-income households," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 938-952.
    5. Forsyth, Ann & Lytle, Leslie & Van Riper, David, 2010. "Finding food: Issues and challenges in using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to measure food access," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 3(1), pages 43-65.
    6. Rudkin, Simon, 2015. "Supermarket Interventions and Diet in areas of Limited Retail Access: Policy Suggestions from the Seacroft Intervention Study," MPRA Paper 62434, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Matthew Freedman & Annemarie Kuhns, 2017. "Supply-Side Subsidies to Improve Food Access and Dietary Outcomes: Evidence from the New Markets Tax Credit," Working Papers 171804, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    8. Hoolohan, Claire & McLachlan, Carly, 2015. "Consumers and energy demand in food supply chains: Synthesising insights from the social sciences," 143rd Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, March 25-27, 2015, Naples, Italy 202743, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Bridle-Fitzpatrick, Susan, 2015. "Food deserts or food swamps?: A mixed-methods study of local food environments in a Mexican city," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 202-213.
    10. Michael D. M. Bader & Marnie Purciel & Paulette Yousefzadeh & Kathryn M. Neckerman, 2010. "Disparities in Neighborhood Food Environments: Implications of Measurement Strategies," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 86(4), pages 409-430, October.
    11. Cannuscio, Carolyn C. & Hillier, Amy & Karpyn, Allison & Glanz, Karen, 2014. "The social dynamics of healthy food shopping and store choice in an urban environment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 13-20.
    12. Wu, Qi & Saitone, Tina L. & Sexton, Richard J., 2016. "Food Access, Food Deserts, and the Women, Infants, and Children Program," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236263, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Eckel, Carsten, 2007. "International trade and retailing: Diversity versus accessibility and the creation of retail deserts," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 66, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    14. Leonard, Tammy & McKillop, Caitlin & Carson, Jo Ann & Shuval, Kerem, 2014. "Neighborhood effects on food consumption," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 99-113.
    15. Jessie Handbury & Ilya Rahkovsky & Molly Schnell, 2015. "Is the Focus on Food Deserts Fruitless? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum," NBER Working Papers 21126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Rudkin, Simon, 2015. "Deconstructing Supermarket Interventions as a Mechanism for Improving Diet: Lessons from the Seacroft Intervention Study," MPRA Paper 64994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. repec:bla:ijurrs:v:41:y:2017:i:3:p:414-425 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Asfaw, Abay, 2007. "Supermarket purchases and the dietary patterns of households in Guatemala:," IFPRI discussion papers 696, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Quynh LĂȘ & Hoang Nguyen & Daniel Terry & Stefan Dieters & Stuart Auckland & Gretchen Long, 2015. "Quantifying and visualizing access to healthy food in a rural area of Australia: A spatial analysis," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 7(5), pages 1017-1029, October.
    20. Frederick Guy, 2013. "Small, Local and Cheap? Walkable and Car-oriented Retail in Competition," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 425-442, February.
    21. Rischke, Ramona & Kimenju, Simon C. & Klasen, Stephan & Qaim, Matin, 2015. "Supermarkets and food consumption patterns: The case of small towns in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 9-21.
    22. Stafford, Mai & Cummins, Steven & Ellaway, Anne & Sacker, Amanda & Wiggins, Richard D. & Macintyre, Sally, 2007. "Pathways to obesity: Identifying local, modifiable determinants of physical activity and diet," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(9), pages 1882-1897, November.
    23. Mark LeClair & Anna-Maria Aksan, 2014. "Redefining the food desert: combining GIS with direct observation to measure food access," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 537-547, December.
    24. repec:bla:rgscpp:v:9:y:2017:i:1:p:39-59 is not listed on IDEAS

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