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Measuring neighbourhood spatial accessibility to urban amenities: does aggregation error matter?

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  • Jared Hewko
  • Karen E Smoyer-Tomic
  • M John Hodgson

Abstract

Neighbourhood spatial accessibility (NSA) refers to the ease with which residents of a given neighbourhood can reach amenities. NSA indicators have been used to inform urban policy issues, such as amenity provision and spatial equity. NSA measures are, however, susceptible to numerous methodological problems. We investigate one methodological issue, aggregation error, as it relates to the measurement of NSA. Aggregation error arises when, for the purpose of distance calculations, a single point is used to represent a neighbourhood, which in turn represents an aggregation of spatially distributed individuals. NSA to three types of recreational amenities (playgrounds, community halls, and leisure centres) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is used to assess whether aggregation error affects NSA measures. The authors use exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, including local indicators of spatial association, to examine aggregation-error effects on NSA. By integrating finer resolution data into NSA measures, we demonstrate that aggregation error does affect NSA indicators, but that the effect depends on the type of amenity under investigation. Aggregation error is particularly problematic when measuring NSA to amenities that are abundant and have highly localized service areas, such as playgrounds. We recommend that, when analyzing NSA to these types of amenities, researchers integrate finer resolution data to indicate the spatial distribution of individuals within neighbourhoods better, and hence reduce aggregation error.

Suggested Citation

  • Jared Hewko & Karen E Smoyer-Tomic & M John Hodgson, 2002. "Measuring neighbourhood spatial accessibility to urban amenities: does aggregation error matter?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 34(7), pages 1185-1206, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:34:y:2002:i:7:p:1185-1206
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2012. "The Personal City: The Experimental, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt67d5w48s, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. BOUSSELIN Audrey, 2017. "Childcare, maternal employment and residential location," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-05, LISER.
    3. Jacobson, Jerry Owen & Robinson, Paul & Bluthenthal, Ricky N., 2007. "A multilevel decomposition approach to estimate the role of program location and neighborhood disadvantage in racial disparities in alcohol treatment completion," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 462-476, January.
    4. Cutts, Bethany B. & Darby, Kate J. & Boone, Christopher G. & Brewis, Alexandra, 2009. "City structure, obesity, and environmental justice: An integrated analysis of physical and social barriers to walkable streets and park access," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 1314-1322, November.
    5. Herbst, Chris M. & Tekin, Erdal, 2012. "The geographic accessibility of child care subsidies and evidence on the impact of subsidy receipt on childhood obesity," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 37-52.
    6. repec:spr:soinre:v:133:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1375-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kovacs, Kent F., 2005. "Amount and Spatial Distribution of Public Open Space to Maximize the Net Benefits from Urban Recreation," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19206, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:9:p:1552-:d:110429 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ulimwengu, John M. & Guo, Xiaoqi, 2004. "Modeling Spatial Accessibility Within Discrete Choice Framework," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20170, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2013. "The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7014d9cg, University of California Transportation Center.

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