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Leaving home for college and gaining independence

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  • Clara H Mulder
  • William A V Clark

Abstract

As more and more young US adults attend college it has become an increasingly important filter in the process of becoming an independent household. Now for a large number of young adults living in the USA, living away at college is a first step in the process of gaining residential and economic independence. We analyze leaving home to go to college, the choice between returning home and becoming independent after living away at college, and the influence of experience with living away at college on becoming an independent household. We use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and multilevel event-history and logistic-regression models to show that the likelihood of leaving home for college is positively affected by the father's education and the parental income. Unlike in previous research, we find evidence for the 'feathered-nest' hypothesis, in that the likelihood of returning home increases with parental income.

Suggested Citation

  • Clara H Mulder & William A V Clark, 2002. "Leaving home for college and gaining independence," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 34(6), pages 981-999, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:34:y:2002:i:6:p:981-999
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    Cited by:

    1. Juliet Stone & Ann Berrington & Jane Falkingham, 2014. "Gender, Turning Points, and Boomerangs: Returning Home in Young Adulthood in Great Britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 257-276, February.
    2. Carla Sá & Raymond Florax & Piet Rietveld, 2007. "Living-arrangement and university decisions of Dutch young adults," NIPE Working Papers 14/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    3. Frances Goldscheider & Sandra Hofferth & Sally Curtin, 2014. "Parenthood and Leaving Home in Young Adulthood," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(6), pages 771-796, December.
    4. Ilya Kashnitsky & Nikita Mkrtchyan & Oleg Leshukov, 2016. "Interregional Migration of Youths in Russia: A Comprehensive Analysis of Demographic Statistics," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 169-203.

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