IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/pio/envira/v30y1998i9p1531-1546.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Building institutional capacity through collaborative approaches to urban planning

Author

Listed:
  • P Healey

Abstract

Improving the qualities of places is attracting increasing policy and academic interest in contemporary Europe. This raises questions about the appropriate governance capacity to deliver such improvements. I argue that a key element of such capacity lies in the quality of local policy cultures. Some are well integrated, well connected, and well informed, and can mobilise readily to act to capture opportunities and enhance local conditions. Others are fragmented, lack the connections to sources of power and knowledge, and the mobilisation capacity, to organise to make a difference. In recent years, the emphasis in attempts to change urban governance capacity, particularly in Britain, has been on encouraging catalytic projects and partnerships. Recent experience across Europe suggests that wider transformative effects are difficult to achieve without careful consideration of the partnership form and how it connects to the wider policy culture. They may also have the effect of increasing the fragmentation of local capacity. I examine the potential of collaborative approaches in place-making initiatives in achieving more effective and durable transformations. Collaborative approaches emphasise the importance of building new policy discourses about the qualities of places, developing collaboration among stakeholders in policy development as well as delivery, widening stakeholder involvement beyond traditional power elites, recognising different forms of local knowledge, and building rich social networks as a resource of institutional capital through which new initiatives can be taken rapidly and legitimately. They shift the task of urban planning from 'building places' to fostering the institutional capacity in territorial political communities for ongoing 'place-making' activities.

Suggested Citation

  • P Healey, 1998. "Building institutional capacity through collaborative approaches to urban planning," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(9), pages 1531-1546, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:30:y:1998:i:9:p:1531-1546
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=a301531
    File Function: abstract
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/A.html for details

    File URL: http://www.envplan.com/epa/fulltext/a30/a301531.pdf
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: Fulltext access restricted to subscribers, see http://www.envplan.co.uk/A.html for details

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lisa Van Well, 2011. "Dealing with Dichotomies: The case of Bornholm," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1330, European Regional Science Association.
    2. repec:eee:ecoser:v:12:y:2015:i:c:p:218-227 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Riccardo Crescenzi, 2008. "Mountains in a flat world: why proximity still matters for the location of economic activity," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 1(3), pages 371-388.
    4. Angelique Chettiparamb, 2007. "Steering across scales: applying a strategic-relational approach to a study of land mobilisation for road widening in Kochi," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 413-427.
    5. Patsy Healey, 1998. "Regulating property development and the capacity of the development industry," Journal of Property Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 211-227, January.
    6. Christopher T. Boyko & Rachel Cooper, 2013. "Density and Decision-Making: Findings from an Online Survey," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(10), pages 1-21, October.
    7. Breukers, Sylvia & Wolsink, Maarten, 2007. "Wind power implementation in changing institutional landscapes: An international comparison," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 2737-2750, May.
    8. Frank Boons & Wouter Spekkink & Wenting Jiao, 2014. "A Process Perspective on Industrial Symbiosis," Journal of Industrial Ecology, Yale University, vol. 18(3), pages 341-355, May.
    9. Carpenter, Ann, 2015. "Resilience in planning: a review of comprehensive plans in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina," FRB Atlanta Community and Economic Development Discussion Paper 2015-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    10. Alexander Walter & Roland Scholz, 2007. "Critical success conditions of collaborative methods: a comparative evaluation of transport planning projects," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 195-212, March.
    11. Primmer, Eeva, 2011. "Policy, project and operational networks: Channels and conduits for learning in forest biodiversity conservation," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 132-142.
    12. Will Poppe & Douglas Young, 2015. "The Politics of Place: Place-making versus Densification in Toronto's Tower Neighbourhoods," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 613-621, May.
    13. Annamaria Fiore & Maria Jennifer Grisorio & Francesco Prota, 2009. "Do we really need regional innovation agencies? Some insights from the experience of an Italian region," SERIES 0025, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Nov 2009.
    14. Wolsink, Maarten, 2000. "Wind power and the NIMBY-myth: institutional capacity and the limited significance of public support," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 49-64.
    15. Carpenter, Ann, 2013. "Social ties, space, and resilience: Literature review of community resilience to disasters and constituent social and built environment factors," FRB Atlanta Community and Economic Development Discussion Paper 2013-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    16. Resmini, Laura, 2006. "Theoretical and Methodological Study on Comparative Advantages in Dynamic Growth Regions, Convergence and Inequalities Patterns," Papers DYNREG03, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    17. Ren-Fang Chao, 2015. "Development of Slow Tourism Challenge and Operation Architecture: A Case Study on Green Island, Taiwan," Acta Oeconomica, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 65(supplemen), pages 351-367, December.
    18. Pesch, Udo, 2015. "Tracing discursive space: Agency and change in sustainability transitions," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PB), pages 379-388.
    19. Jesse Heley & Kate Moles, 2012. "Partnership working in regions: Reflections on local government collaboration in Wales," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(2), pages 139-153, June.
    20. María Elena Botero Ospina, 2016. "Las disparidades regionales: Una exploración teórica interdisciplinaria," REVISTA ECONOMÍA & REGIÓN, UNIVERSIDAD TECNOLÓGICA DE BOLÍVAR, vol. 10(1), pages 165-193, June.
    21. Jonathan Metzger, 2013. "Raising the Regional Leviathan: A Relational-Materialist Conceptualization of Regions-in-Becoming as Publics-in-Stabilization," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 1368-1395, July.
    22. repec:eee:touman:v:61:y:2017:i:c:p:129-140 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:30:y:1998:i:9:p:1531-1546. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Neil Hammond). General contact details of provider: http://www.pion.co.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.