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Assessing the economic costs of sea level rise

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  • R K Turner
  • N Adger
  • P Doktor

Abstract

Sea level rise is one of the potential consequences of human induced global climate change, and coastal zones, together with their inhabitants, may be becoming more susceptible and vulnerable to such external shocks and related damage impacts. Global, regional, and national scale studies have been undertaken in an attempt to assess the future threat posed by sea level rise. To date none of these studies have fully encompassed the relationship between the physical change impacts and the socioeconomic implications. The authors utilise both a 'GDP-at-risk' and an economic cost —benefit approach, in combination with biophysical analysis, to model the impacts of sea level rise along the East Anglian coastline of eastern England. The economic results indicate that for most sea-level-rise predictions the protect strategy is economically justifiable on a region-wide basis. At a more localised scale a combination of response options, including 'do nothing and retreat', may be optimal.

Suggested Citation

  • R K Turner & N Adger & P Doktor, 1995. "Assessing the economic costs of sea level rise," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 27(11), pages 1777-1796, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:27:y:1995:i:11:p:1777-1796
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    Cited by:

    1. David Anthoff & Robert Nicholls & Richard Tol, 2010. "The economic impact of substantial sea-level rise," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 321-335, April.
    2. Andrea Bigano & Francesco Bosello & Roberto Roson & Richard Tol, 2008. "Economy-wide impacts of climate change: a joint analysis for sea level rise and tourism," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 13(8), pages 765-791, October.
    3. Bosello, Francesco & De Cian, Enrica, 2014. "Climate change, sea level rise, and coastal disasters. A review of modeling practices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 593-605.
    4. David Anthoff & Robert J. Nicholls & Richard S.J. Tol, 2007. "Sea Level Rise And Equity Weighting," Working Papers FNU-136, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised May 2007.
    5. Francesco Bosello & Roberto Roson & Richard Tol, 2007. "Economy-wide Estimates of the Implications of Climate Change: Sea Level Rise," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(3), pages 549-571, July.

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