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Labor migration amongst hierarchically competing and intervening origins and destinations

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  • T J Fik
  • R G Amey
  • G F Mulligan

Abstract

A spatial interaction methodology is developed for modeling flows in a hierarchical system. A competing and intervening destinations framework is employed to model and predict US state-to-state labor migration. This analysis is used to assess the importance of geographic variables in explaining variations in regional labor flows. Empirical findings suggest that US labor migration is largely explained by Newtonian and systemic forces -- size, distance, locational accessibility, and intervening opportunities in a spatial hierarchy. It is also suggested that lagged migration or migrant stock is a product of the combined effect of these forces.

Suggested Citation

  • T J Fik & R G Amey & G F Mulligan, 1992. "Labor migration amongst hierarchically competing and intervening origins and destinations," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 24(9), pages 1271-1290, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:24:y:1992:i:9:p:1271-1290
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    Cited by:

    1. Yongwan Chun, 2008. "Modeling network autocorrelation within migration flows by eigenvector spatial filtering," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 317-344, December.
    2. Jean-Michel Guldmann, 1998. "Competing destinations and intervening opportunities interaction models of inter-city telecommunication flows," ERSA conference papers ersa98p120, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Jens Petter Gitlesen & Inge Thorsen & Jan Ubøe, 2004. "Misspecifications in modelling journeys to work," ERSA conference papers ersa04p420, European Regional Science Association.
    4. David Plane & Gordon Mulligan, 1997. "Measuring spatial focusing in a migration system," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(2), pages 251-262, May.
    5. Gitlesen, Jens Petter & Thorsen, Inge & Ubøe, Jan, 2004. "Misspecifications due to aggregation of data in models for journeys-to-work," Discussion Papers 2004/13, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Business and Management Science.
    6. E. Lance Howe & Lee Huskey & Matthew D. Berman, 2011. "Migration in Arctic Alaska: Empirical Evidence of the Stepping Stones Hypothesis," Working Papers 2011-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.

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