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The Complexity Revolution and the Future of Economics

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  • D. COLANDER.

Abstract

The paper considers the change in theoretical and empirical research in modern economics. This change is driven by the emergence of new theoretical approaches associated with the complexity theory and behavioral economics. The author shows that in future economists will reject some basic assumptions of neoclassical economics and adopt many different interdisciplinary approaches in order to study concrete economic problems. These gradual transformations should considerably change the structure of economic knowledge. Formal modeling will be of minor importance and will give place to more applied fields of research.

Suggested Citation

  • D. Colander., 2009. "The Complexity Revolution and the Future of Economics," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 1.
  • Handle: RePEc:nos:voprec:2009-01-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel J. Benjamin & David I. Laibson, 2003. "Good policies for bad governments: behavioral political economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 48(Jun).
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    Cited by:

    1. Magda Fontana, 2006. "Computer simulations, mathematics and economics," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 53(1), pages 96-123, March.
    2. Gnidchenko, Andrey, 2011. "Моделирование Технологических И Институциональных Эффектов В Макроэкономическом Прогнозировании
      [Technological and Institutional Effects Modeling in Macroeconomic Forecasting]
      ," MPRA Paper 35484, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2011.
    3. Jacinto Brito González, 2004. "Conocimiento, geografía e instituciones: Una aproximación a la problemática del crecimiento en el archipiélago canario," Documentos de trabajo conjunto ULL-ULPGC 2004-03, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas de la ULPGC.
    4. Milo Bianchi & Magnus Henrekson, 2005. "Is Neoclassical Economics still Entrepreneurless?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 353-377, July.
    5. Richard Holt & J. Barkley Rosser & David Colander, 2011. "The Complexity Era in Economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 357-369.
    6. Magda Fontana, 2010. "The Santa Fe Perspective on economics: emerging patterns in the science of complexity," History of Economic Ideas, Fabrizio Serra Editore, Pisa - Roma, vol. 18(2), pages 167-196.
    7. David Colander, 2003. "Complexity, Muddling Through, and Sustainable Forest Management," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0320, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    8. Kumaraswamy Velupillai, 2003. "Economics and the complexity vision: chimerical partners or elysian adventurers," Department of Economics Working Papers 0307, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    9. Rubinstein, A., 2013. "Normative Vector in Economic Analysis. The Second Discovery of Meritorics," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 162-166.
    10. Fontana, Magda, 2010. "Can neoclassical economics handle complexity? The fallacy of the oil spot dynamic," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 584-596, December.
    11. Johannes M. Bauer, 2004. "Governing the Networks of the Information Society. Prospects and limits of policy in a complex technical system," ITA manu:scripts 04_03, Institute of Technology Assessment (ITA).
    12. Fontana Magda, 2008. "The complexity approach to economics : a Paradigm shift," CESMEP Working Papers 200801, University of Turin.
    13. Tim Kochanski, 2012. "Toward Teaching Markets as Complex Systems: A Web Based Simulation Assignment Implemented in Netlogo," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(2), pages 102-114.
    14. K. Vela Velupillai, 2005. "The impossibility of an effective theory of policy in a complex economy," Department of Economics Working Papers 0514, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

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