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Rentabilidad salarial de la formación laboral: un análisis con datos de panel /Wage Returns to Training Investments: A Panel Data Analysis



    () (Departamento de Estadística y Econometría Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales Universidad de Málaga)


    () (Departamento de Estadística y Econometría. Universidad de Málaga. Telf.: 952 13 12 09-Fax: 952 13 20 57)


    () (Departamento de Estadística y Econometría. UNIVERSIDAD DE MÁLAGA.)


El presente trabajo utiliza datos procedentes del Panel de Hogares de la Unión Europea (INE, 1994-2001) para estimar el efecto de la formación recibida durante el empleo en el crecimiento salarial de hombres y mujeres en el mercado de trabajo español. Dado que estas inversiones educativas pueden estar relacionadas con determinantes no observados del crecimiento salarial, se emplea el método de estimación de variables instrumentales para datos de panel propuesto por Hausman y Taylor (1981). Las medidas de formación usadas en las estimaciones diferencian tales actividades según quién las financie (empresa o empleado), incluyéndose además medidas de duración e intensidad, a fin de estimar su rendimiento con mayor precisión. Los resultados muestran que, efectivamente, realizar este tipo de inversiones proporciona a los trabajadores un mayor incremento salarial, si bien esto depende de cómo se realicen y su duración. This paper uses data drawn from the European Community Household Panel (INE, 1994-2001) to estimate the effect of labour market training on wage growth for both female and male wage earners in Spain. As these educational investments might be correlated to other unobserved determinants of wage growth, we use the instrumental variable estimator for panel data proposed by Hausman and Taylor (1981). To more precisely measure the effect of training we differentiate among employer-financed and self-employed training as well as indicators, and later include variables for training length and intensity. Our results show that, indeed, training investments provide workers with higher wage increases. This, however, depends on how training is undertaken and how long it takes.

Suggested Citation

  • Caparrós Ruiz, Antonio & Navarro Gomez, Mª Lucia & Rueda Narváez, Mario F., 2010. "Rentabilidad salarial de la formación laboral: un análisis con datos de panel /Wage Returns to Training Investments: A Panel Data Analysis," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 28, pages 483(20á.)-4, Agosto.
  • Handle: RePEc:lrk:eeaart:28_2_15

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Gylfi Zoega, 2003. "Unions, Work-Related Training, and Wages: Evidence for British Men," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 68-91, October.
    2. Hausman, Jerry A & Taylor, William E, 1981. "Panel Data and Unobservable Individual Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1377-1398, November.
    3. Black, Matthew, 1980. "Pecuniary Implications of On-the-Job Search and Quit Activity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 222-229, May.
    4. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark Bryan, 2010. "Are there asymmetries in the effects of training on the conditional male wage distribution?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 251-272, January.
    5. David Campbell, 2001. "Estimating the Wage Effects of Job Mobility in Britain," Studies in Economics 0117, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    6. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    7. Sara Rica & Juan Dolado & Vanesa Llorens, 2008. "Ceilings or floors? Gender wage gaps by education in Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 751-776, July.
    8. Cecilia Albert & Carlos García-Serrano & Virginia Hernanz, 2004. "Firm-provided training and temporary contracts," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 67-88, January.
    9. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2005. "Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    10. repec:eme:rleczz:s0147-9121(06)26003-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    13. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
    14. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 791-836, August.
    15. Keith, Kristen & McWilliams, Abagail, 1997. "Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 320-333, April.
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    More about this item


    Formación laboral; salarios; datos de panel; variables instrumentales ; Training; wages; panel data; instrumental variables.;

    JEL classification:

    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models


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