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Public transport demand: dynamic panel model analysis


  • Manel Daldoul

    (University of Carthage)

  • Sami Jarboui

    () (University of Lyon
    University of Sfax)

  • Ahlem Dakhlaoui

    (University of Carthage)


Abstract This paper presents an original essay that explains the mobility behaviour towards the public transport supply in Tunisia. This research aims to determine the key variables affecting an individual’s decision to travel by public transport and explains how the use of these means fits the mobility strategies. The dynamic panel model is applied to twelve Tunisian Regional companies, where we aim to analyze the behaviours of Tunisian citizens in the regions where Regional Transport Companies ensure the total service supply of urban, interurban and suburban public transport of travellers. The results show that mobility behaviours are subject to various variables. In particular, service quality, mean price and active population are the most significant variables regarding public transport demand in Tunisia.

Suggested Citation

  • Manel Daldoul & Sami Jarboui & Ahlem Dakhlaoui, 2016. "Public transport demand: dynamic panel model analysis," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 491-505, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:43:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9586-1 DOI: 10.1007/s11116-015-9586-1

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Transport demand; Mobility behaviour; Socioeconomics factor; Public transport; Dynamic panel model;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • L91 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Transportation: General
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise


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