IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/mktlet/v27y2016i3d10.1007_s11002-015-9363-0.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

From digital media influencers to celebrity endorsers: attributions drive endorser effectiveness

Author

Listed:
  • Sommer Kapitan

    () (Auckland University of Technology)

  • David H. Silvera

    (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Abstract

Abstract We propose that attributions about an endorser truly liking, using, or desiring a promoted product mediate the relationship between source and message factors and persuasion via endorsement. In this paper, we integrate the persuasion literature into a framework for examining endorser effectiveness via focus factors (e.g., involvement, cognitive load) that determine whether a consumer thinks carefully or superficially about a message, and lead consumers to rely on different source and message elements (e.g., source attractiveness, argument strength). These elements then influence attributional processing. Correspondent inferences about an endorser can lead to enhanced advertisement and brand attitudes, and spur either fleeting identification with the endorsement or more enduring internalization (Kelman, The Public Opinion Quarterly 25:57–78, 1961) of the endorser’s message as a consumer’s own. Implications of our framework and research directions are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Sommer Kapitan & David H. Silvera, 2016. "From digital media influencers to celebrity endorsers: attributions drive endorser effectiveness," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 553-567, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:27:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s11002-015-9363-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11002-015-9363-0
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11002-015-9363-0
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yong-Soon Kang & Paul M. Herr, 2006. "Beauty and the Beholder: Toward an Integrative Model of Communication Source Effects," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 123-130, June.
    2. Kardes, Frank R, et al, 1993. " Brand Retrieval, Consideration Set Composition, Consumer Choice, and the Pioneering Advantage," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 62-75, June.
    3. Friestad, Marian & Wright, Peter, 1994. " The Persuasion Knowledge Model: How People Cope with Persuasion Attempts," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-31, June.
    4. McCracken, Grant, 1989. " Who Is the Celebrity Endorser? Cultural Foundations of the Endorsement Process," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 310-321, December.
    5. Petty, Richard E & Cacioppo, John T & Schumann, David, 1983. " Central and Peripheral Routes to Advertising Effectiveness: The Moderating Role of Involvement," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 135-146, September.
    6. Kahle, Lynn R & Homer, Pamela M, 1985. " Physical Attractiveness of the Celebrity Endorser: A Social Adaptation Perspective," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 954-961, March.
    7. Jonah Berger & Morgan Ward, 2010. "Subtle Signals of Inconspicuous Consumption," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(4), pages 555-569, December.
    8. Meyers-Levy, Joan & Tybout, Alice M, 1989. " Schema Congruity as a Basis for Product Evaluation," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 39-54, June.
    9. Misra, Shekhar & Beatty, Sharon E., 1990. "Celebrity spokesperson and brand congruence : An assessment of recall and affect," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 159-173, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:27:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s11002-015-9363-0. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.