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Using consumer responsibility reminders to reduce cuteness-induced indulgent consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Maura L. Scott

    () (Florida State University)

  • Gergana Y. Nenkov

    () (Boston College)

Abstract

Abstract Cute products targeted to adults abound in the marketplace, and recent research has shown that whimsically cute products can increase indulgent consumption in adults. The current research explores the potential of using consumer reminders to curb these effects. This research identifies consumer responsibility reminders as an important factor that can limit indulgent consumption induced by exposure to cute products. Two studies show that the effect of cute products on indulgence can be reduced by (1) reminding consumers of their responsibility for their outcomes in life by enhancing feelings of personal control and (2) reminding consumers of their responsibility to other people by increasing prosocial orientation. Findings from this research have important implications for helping consumers make choices more consistent with their long-term well-being when faced with cute products in various categories.

Suggested Citation

  • Maura L. Scott & Gergana Y. Nenkov, 2016. "Using consumer responsibility reminders to reduce cuteness-induced indulgent consumption," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 323-336, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:27:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11002-014-9336-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s11002-014-9336-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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