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Darwinism, organizational evolution and survival: key challenges for future research

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  • Gianpaolo Abatecola

    () (University of Rome “Tor Vergata”)

  • Fiorenza Belussi

    () (University of Padua)

  • Dermot Breslin

    () (Sheffield University Management School)

  • Igor Filatotchev

    () (City University London)

Abstract

Abstract How do social organizations evolve? How do they adapt to environmental pressures? What resources and capabilities determine their survival within dynamic competition? Charles Darwin’s seminal work The Origin of Species (1859) has provided a significant impact on the development of the management and organization theory literatures on organizational evolution. This article introduces the JMG Special Issue focused on Darwinism, organizational evolution and survival. We discuss key themes in the organizational evolution research that have emerged in recent years. These include the increasing adoption of the co-evolutionary approach, with a particular focus on the definition of appropriate units of analysis, such as routines, and related challenges associated with exploring the relationship between co-evolution, re-use of knowledge, adaptation, and exaptation processes. We then introduce the three articles that we have finally accepted in this Special Issue after an extensive, multi-round, triple blind-review process. We briefly outline how each of these articles contributes to understanding among scholars, practitioners and policy makers of the continuous evolutionary processes within and among social organizations and systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianpaolo Abatecola & Fiorenza Belussi & Dermot Breslin & Igor Filatotchev, 2016. "Darwinism, organizational evolution and survival: key challenges for future research," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jmgtgv:v:20:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s10997-015-9310-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s10997-015-9310-8
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:652-:d:134062 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:5:p:901-910 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Darwinism; Adaptation; Co-evolution; Exaptation;

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