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Some characteristics of innovation activities: Silicon Valley, California, China and Taiwan

Author

Listed:
  • K. C. Fung

    () (University of California)

  • Nathalie Aminian

    (University of Rouen)

  • Chris Y. Tung

    (National Sun Yat-sen University)

Abstract

Abstract In this paper we examine some characteristics of the innovation activities in China and in Taiwan. For comparison, we also highlight some high-technology features of Silicon Valley and California. We use two models to look at innovation activities in California, China and Taiwan: The “Silicon Valley” model and the “layered model”. For China, we highlight the important role of the early technology cluster in ZGC in Beijing. ZGC has some positive features for growth such as government support, spinoffs as well as agglomeration effect like Silicon Valley. But the most interesting development in China is the evolution of its internet-related sector. We argue here that the internet-driven economy is a radical, systemic technological change and it is rapidly growing in China. In addition, the development of the internet economy will have substantial implication for China’s nature of growth. It can boost productivity and may even propel China into a high-income economy. Taiwan’s development of high-technology relies on the establishment of a major science park and an important research institute. Like China, government support and the expertise provided by the trans-Pacific “returness” are crucial. But unlike China or Silicon Valley, Taiwan is stuck in a manufacturing- and hardware-focused segment of the industry. Taiwan needs to upgrade to software and the internet-focused segment but so far with limited success.

Suggested Citation

  • K. C. Fung & Nathalie Aminian & Chris Y. Tung, 2016. "Some characteristics of innovation activities: Silicon Valley, California, China and Taiwan," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 221-240, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:49:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s10644-015-9162-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s10644-015-9162-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Silicon Valley; California; Innovation; China; Taiwan;

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