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Editorial: Methodology in judgment and decision making research

  • Andreas Glockner
  • Benjamin E. Hilbig
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    In this introduction to the special issue on methodology, we provide background on its original motivation and a systematic overview of the contributions. The latter are discussed with correspondence to the phase of the scientific process they (most strongly) refer to: Theory construction, design, data analysis, and cumulative development of scientific knowledge. Several contributions propose novel measurement techniques and paradigms that will allow for new insights and can thus avail researchers in JDM and beyond. Another set of contributions centers around how models can best be tested and/or compared. Especially when viewed in combination, the papers on this topic spell out vital necessities for model comparisons and provide approaches that solve noteworthy problems prior work has been faced with.

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    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 8 (December)
    Pages: 705-710

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:6:y:2011:i:8:p:705-710
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    1. Joseph Henrich & Steve J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan, 2010. "The Weirdest People in the World?," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 139, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
    2. Stephen B. Broomell & Budescu, David V. & Han-Hui Por, 2011. "Pair-wise comparisons of multiple models," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 821-831, December.
    3. Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck & Anton Kuhberger & Rob Ranyard, 2011. "The role of process data in the development and testing of process models of judgment and decision making," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 733-739, December.
    4. Andreas Glockner & Tilmann Betsch, 2011. "The Empirical content of theories in judgment and decision making: Shortcomings and remedies," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 711-721, December.
    5. John R. Doyle & Catherine H. Chen & Krishna Savani, 2011. "New designs for research in delay discounting," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 759-770, December.
    6. Ryan O. Murphy & Kurt A. Ackerman & Michel J. J. Handgraaf, 2011. "Measuring social value orientation," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 771-781, December.
    7. William J. Matthews, 2011. "What would judgment and decision making research be like if we took a Bayesian approach to hypothesis testing?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 843-856, December.
    8. Benjamin E. Hilbig, 2008. "One-reason decision making in risky choice? A closer look at the priority heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 3(6), pages 457-462, August.
    9. Klaus Fiedler, 2010. "How to study cognitive decision algorithms: The case of the priority heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(1), pages 21-32, February.
    10. Ana M. Franco-Watkins & Joseph G. Johnson, 2011. "Applying the decision moving window to risky choice: Comparison of eye-tracking and mousetracing methods," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 740-749, December.
    11. Thorsten Pachur, 2011. "The limited value of precise tests of the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 413-422, July.
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