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Recognising the recognition heuristic for what it is (and what it's not)

  • Ben R. Newell
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    The diversity, ingenuity and differences of opinion displayed in the articles of the recent special issues on the recognition heuristic are testament to the power and theoretical fertility of a simple idea about the role of recognition in decision making. In this brief comment I mention a number of these papers, but my focus is on points of agreement and disagreement with the conclusions drawn by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (2011) in their review of a decade's worth of research on the recognition heuristic.

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    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 (July)
    Pages: 409-412

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:6:y:2011:i:5:p:409-412
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    1. Hoyer, Wayne D & Brown, Steven P, 1990. " Effects of Brand Awareness on Choice for a Common, Repeat-Purchase Product," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 141-48, September.
    2. Tracy Tomlinson & Julian N. Marewski & Michael Dougherty, 2011. "Four challenges for cognitive research on the recognition heuristic and a call for a research strategy shift," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 89-99, February.
    3. Gerd Gigerenzer & Daniel G. Goldstein, 2011. "The recognition heuristic: A decade of research," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 100-121, February.
    4. Ulrich Hoffrage, 2011. "Recognition judgments and the performance of the recognition heuristic depend on the size of the reference class," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 43-57, February.
    5. Michael Smithson, 2010. "When less is more in the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 230-243, July.
    6. C. Philip Beaman & Philip T. Smith & Caren A. Frosch & Rachel McCloy, 2010. "Less-is-more effects without the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 258-271, July.
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