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Recognition-based judgments and decisions: What we have learned (so far)

  • Julian N. Marewski
  • Rudiger F. Pohl
  • Oliver Vitouch
Registered author(s):

    This special issue on recognition processes in inferential decision making represents an adversarial collaboration among the three guest editors. This introductory article to the special issue's third and final part comes in three sections. In Section 1, we summarize the six papers that appear in this part. In Section 2, we give a wrap-up of the lessons learned. Specifically, we discuss (i) why studying the recognition heuristic has led to so much controversy, making it difficult to settle on mutually accepted empirically grounded assumptions, (ii) whether the development of the recognition heuristic and its theoretical descriptions could explain some of the past controversies and misconceptions, (iii) how additional cue knowledge about unrecognized objects could enter the decision process, (iv) why recognition heuristic theory should be complemented by a probabilistic model of strategy selection, and (v) how recognition information might be related to other information, especially when considering real-world applications. In Section 3, we present an outlook on the thorny but fruitful road to cumulative theory integration. Future research on recognition-based inferences should (i) converge on overcoming past controversies, taking an integrative approach to theory building, and considering theories and findings from neighboring fields (such as marketing science and artificial intelligence), (ii) build detailed computational process models of decision strategies, grounded in cognitive architectures, (iii) test existing models of such strategies competitively, (iv) design computational models of the mechanisms of strategy selection, and (v) effectively extend its scope to decision making in the wild, outside controlled laboratory situations.

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    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 (July)
    Pages: 359-380

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:6:y:2011:i:5:p:359-380
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    1. C. Philip Beaman & Philip T. Smith & Caren A. Frosch & Rachel McCloy, 2010. "Less-is-more effects without the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 258-271, July.
    2. Scheibehenne, Benjamin & Broder, Arndt, 2007. "Predicting Wimbledon 2005 tennis results by mere player name recognition," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 415-426.
    3. Ulrich Hoffrage, 2011. "Recognition judgments and the performance of the recognition heuristic depend on the size of the reference class," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 43-57, February.
    4. Nathan Berg & Ulrich Hoffrage & Katarzyna Abramczuk, 2010. "Fast Acceptance by Common Experience - FACE-recognition in Schelling's model of neighborhood segregation," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(5), pages 391-410, August.
    5. Thorsten Pachur, 2011. "The limited value of precise tests of the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 413-422, July.
    6. Daniel G. Goldstein & Gerd Gigerenzer, 2011. "The beauty of simple models: Themes in recognition heuristic research," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 392-395, July.
    7. Stefan M. Herzog & Ralph Hertwig, 2011. "The wisdom of ignorant crowds: Predicting sport outcomes by mere recognition," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 58-72, February.
    8. Clintin P. Davis-Stober & Jason Dana & David V. Budescu, 2010. "Why recognition is rational: Optimality results on single-variable decision rules," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 216-229, July.
    9. Rudiger F. Pohl, 2011. "On the use of recognition in inferential decision making: An overview of the debate," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 423-438, July.
    10. Peter Ayton & Dilek Onkal & Lisa McReynolds, 2011. "Effects of ignorance and information on judgments and decisions," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 381-391, July.
    11. Benjamin E. Hilbig, 2010. "Precise models deserve precise measures: A methodological dissection," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 272-284, July.
    12. Tracy Tomlinson & Julian N. Marewski & Michael Dougherty, 2011. "Four challenges for cognitive research on the recognition heuristic and a call for a research strategy shift," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 89-99, February.
    13. John Hauser, 2011. "A marketing science perspective on recognition-based heuristics (and the fast-and-frugal paradigm)," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 396-408, July.
    14. Wolfgang Gaissmaier & Julian N. Marewski, 2011. "Forecasting elections with mere recognition from small, lousy samples: A comparison of collective recognition, wisdom of crowds, and representative polls," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 73-88, February.
    15. Berg, Nathan & Gigerenzer, Gerd, 2010. "As-if behavioral economics: Neoclassical economics in disguise?," MPRA Paper 26586, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Edgar Erdfelder & Carolina E. Kupper-Tetzel & Sandra D. Mattern, 2011. "Threshold models of recognition and the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 7-22, February.
    17. Gigerenzer, Gerd & Todd, Peter M. & ABC Research Group,, 2000. "Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195143812, March.
    18. Onvara Oeusoonthornwattana & David R. Shanks, 2010. "I like what I know: Is recognition a non-compensatory determiner of consumer choice?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 310-325, July.
    19. Gerd Gigerenzer & Daniel G. Goldstein, 2011. "The recognition heuristic: A decade of research," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 100-121, February.
    20. Julian N. Marewski & R\"udiger F. Pohl & Oliver Vitouch, 2011. "Recognition-based judgments and decisions: Introduction to the special issue (II)," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 1-6, February.
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