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Affect, risk perception and future optimism after the tsunami disaster

  • Daniel Vastfjall
  • Ellen Peters
  • Paul Slovic
Registered author(s):

    Environmental events such as natural disasters may influence the public's affective reactions and decisions. Shortly after the 2004 Tsunami disaster we assessed how affect elicited by thinking about this disaster influenced risk perceptions and future time perspective in Swedish undergraduates not directly affected by the disaster. An experimental manipulation was used to increase the salience of affect associated with the disaster. In Study 1 we found that participants reminded about the tsunami had a sense that their life was more finite and included fewer opportunities than participants in the control condition (not reminded about the tsunami). In Study 2 we found similar effects for risk perceptions. In addition, we showed that manipulations of ease-of-thought influenced the extent to which affect influenced these risk perceptions, with greater ease of thoughts being associated with greater perceived risks.

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    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2008)
    Issue (Month): (January)
    Pages: 64-72

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:3:y:2008:i::p:64-72
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    1. David Hirshleifer & TYLER G. SHUMWAY, 2004. "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," Finance 0412004, EconWPA.
    2. Hsee, Christopher K & Kunreuther, Howard C, 2000. " The Affection Effect in Insurance Decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 141-59, March.
    3. Pham, Michel Tuan, 1998. " Representativeness, Relevance, and the Use of Feelings in Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25(2), pages 144-59, September.
    4. Eduardo B. Andrade, 2005. "Behavioral Consequences of Affect: Combining Evaluative and Regulatory Mechanisms," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 355-362, December.
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