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Psychometric characteristics of two forms of the Slovak version of the Indecisiveness Scale

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  • Jozef Bavolar

Abstract

The study investigates the psychometric characteristics of the Slovak version of the original and short form of the Indecisiveness Scale on three samples of university students and one general population sample. An exploratory as well as confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the one factor structure of the scale with a satisfactory internal consistency and time stability of scores. The criterion validity was examined through relationships with thinking styles, decision-making styles, the Big Five factors, decision outcomes, well-being and perceived stress, as well as through a comparison of the general population sample with a sample with an obsessive-compulsive disorder diagnosis. Subjects who self-reported as undecided in their future intentions regarding migration tendencies had higher scores in indecisiveness. Both examined forms of the Slovak version of the Indecisiveness Scale were demonstrated to be reliable and valid instruments for the measurement of indecisiveness with the short form being favorited as more appropriately tapping into the core aspect of indecisiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Jozef Bavolar, 2018. "Psychometric characteristics of two forms of the Slovak version of the Indecisiveness Scale," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 13(3), pages 287-296, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:13:y:2018:i:3:p:287-296
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    References listed on IDEAS

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